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Can you use Japanese appliances in US?

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Can you use Japanese appliances in US? 2005/1/24 07:06
I bought a denki pot (a pot to boil some water) in Japan, but I realized my transformer couldn't handle it. It uses 900W. My friend told me many Japanese electronics (100V input) work just fine in the U.S., but I am afraid to try it out. Does anyone use Japanese appliances in the U.S. without a transformer? Does it shorten its life?
by Nikki Sato  

Should not use 2005/1/25 20:08
If you use with the higher than the rated voltage, you can not claim the product's liability for whatever happens.
by Shiro rate this post as useful

Some things - yes. 2005/1/25 23:02
I came back from Japan about 8 months ago. I brought back a Japanese DVD player, an electric rice cooker, and an electric coffee pot. All have been working just fine in the US without any support from transformers. Ive heard that the only appliance that you have to be careful with is a hair dryer. Because of the voltage difference (US has higher voltage), a Japanese hair dryer may become too hot and burn out. Also, check with the owners book for the appliances.
by Suteebu rate this post as useful

Thank you! 2005/1/26 15:09
Thank you. That is very helpful. If a rice cooker is working, I would think the pot would work too. I was worried about the computer chip used in some appliances.
by Nikki rate this post as useful

televisions 2005/3/2 19:24
I was wondering the same thing about taking my japanese tv to the US.
by Brenda rate this post as useful

Yes and no... 2005/3/15 05:03
Can you use Japanse appliances in the US?

I am an electrical engineer. My expert opinion is I would stay away from using any appliance that generates heat...such as a hairdryer (as previously mentioned) or a kotatsu or a boiler for tea water...unless you know what you are doing!!

Japan's electrical system is roughly the same as the US's. However, the US's voltage is 120Vac RMS (60Hz)while Japan's is 100Vac RMS (50 or 60Hz depending on region).

So, any heat generating device from Japan that is used in the US will get 20% hotter than it's design intended. The risk is damage to the device and/or fire...or injury of a person. Please be careful!!

That being said, you could use a transformer for such devices if you really must have them. But, heat generating devices are usually pretty high wattage...meaning you'd need some pretty hefty transformers to do the job.

As for electronics such as PCs, VCRs, TVs, etc...check the back side of the device or its external power supply (usually near where the power cord enters). Read what it says there. Laptop PCs, digital camera chargers and the like tend to accept a wide range of voltages because they are designed for export to many countries. My IBM laptop will accept 100-240V. The power supply takes care of converting the input voltage (whatever it may be) to the appropriate voltage used by the device.

As for TV's from Japan...they will work if the voltage range indicated on the back side includes 120V (if not, I wouldn't use it or even plug it in in the US). However, the channel frequencies for Japanese TV are different than American TV. So, it might work okay with a VCR or a satellite reciever (or cable). But, it will not accpet American over-the-air broadcasts. Your Japanese DVD player will not play discs made for use in the US (and vice-versa).

Be careful out there folks!

by Kichigaisensei rate this post as useful

Oops...sorry... 2005/3/15 05:06
A device designed for use on 100V will not get 10% hotter on 120V...it will get 44% hotter!!! I apologize for my mistake...BE CAREFUL!!
by kichigai sensei rate this post as useful

While I got an expert's attention... 2005/3/15 09:56
Thank you, kichigai sensei (cool name ^.^). An experts opinion helps!
When I was looking for a voltage converter, I saw some converters that werent for the electronics with microcomputer built in. Are there two kinds of converters, one works for microcomputer and the other that doesnt work for it? Is that the difference between a voltage converter and a transformer? If you use Japanese electronics in the US, do you think it is more likely to cause a problem when using electronics that uses microcomputer than ones doesnt use microcomputer? Thanks for your attention.
by Nikki rate this post as useful

Can you buy 240v kotatsu heaters? 2005/4/5 17:06
I'd love to get a kotatsu and get it shipped home to Ireland - but can I get a kotatsu heater for it that works at 240 volts with no transformer?
by itchykneesan rate this post as useful

Works for me 2005/4/20 05:13
I've been using my rice cooker regularly for 4 years. It's not just a basic model, it features fuzzy logic. No problems yet!
by Jimichan rate this post as useful

takoyaki grill 2006/6/8 03:11
I just brought a small takoyaki grill home from Japan and am wondering about using it in the US. I don't want it to burn out. Any experiences using these grills in the US?
by mcsl rate this post as useful

Takoyaki maker 2006/6/25 01:59
TO MCSL:
I was going to order a takoyaki maker from Japan, but had the same question. Please let me know if yours works. Thanks.
by stormdog rate this post as useful

Takoyaki 2006/6/30 03:11
I bought a takoyaki cooking machine (grill) from japan and I used here in us every now and then...

so you said its 44% hotter? thats great... atleast for takoyaki machine anyway haha
because i feel like my takoyaki machine is not hot enough(cook so slow) good thing i bring it here to the state ; )

by Tokidoki rate this post as useful

Question! 2006/8/18 04:29
I will be going to Japan for vacation and want to bring my laptop with me. The adapter on the charger says: Input: 100-240Vac.
If Japan is at the 100V, then it should work fine? Is that right?
Thanks!
by Alice rate this post as useful

... 2006/8/18 05:42
Input: 100-240Vac.
If Japan is at the 100V, then it should work fine? Is that right?

Yes, the voltage will work well. So, ou just have to make sure that the plug fits as well:
http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2225.html

by Uji rate this post as useful

Type of plug and transformer in Japan? 2007/1/14 18:15
I have a daughter in Japan and would like to help her out,if possible, especially with kitchen necessities. I am in the U.S. What kind of plugs are used on appliances for the Japanese electrical outlets? Will American plugs work? If an adapter is needed, then what shape (flat or round) and size would be needed? Would she need a transformer if it is made for 120V to use in Japan and if so, what type? Would it be simpler to buy from a store in Japan on-line and if so, does anyone know of a site based in Japan with English that sells appliances and electronics? (I'm thinking of items like a refrigerator, toaster oven, DVD-CD player with AC adapter, and such.) Thank you for any suggestions you post in response.
by SpiritLight rate this post as useful

Re: Type of plug and transformer? 2007/1/14 18:51
If you plan on buy the appliances new and sending it over to Japan, you better make a money transfer to her so that she can buy them herself in Japan. In that case you don't have to worry about plugs, voltage, etc and she skips paying duty on them when she receives them.
by Kappa rate this post as useful

Plugs and Transformers 2007/1/14 19:35
Thank you, Kappa, for your suggestion. An International Money Order will work and be safe to send in US dollars?
by SpiritLight rate this post as useful

I also bought a takoyaki grill.. 2007/6/28 00:02
Same question as above really... will it work? it's a Sanyo HPS-SD41 model and doesn't just do takoyaki though that's the main reason i bought it. I don't want it to burn up my appartment when i use it back home or break. :/ someone please help my fears.

Many Thanks,
Ali

by Ali rate this post as useful

Deep Freezers? 2008/1/15 22:30
We are currently living in Japan and are interested in buying a deep freezer from a Japanese store. Is this safe to use back in the States?? Does anyone have any experience with this?

Thanks!!

by Mdavis rate this post as useful

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