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Physiotherapy in Japan

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Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/15 06:02
Hello!
I'm a Portuguese Physiotherapist and my boyfriend is almost graduating as a Electrical Engineer.
We really want to live in Japan.
How do we get work in our areas in there?
Are there any agency that can help us?
How is the salary of an engineer and a Physiotherapist in Japan?
Thank you for your help!

I have more questions, mas but this ones are just the first!

by Marta (guest)  

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/15 10:27

Is one of your degrees at least bachelor level of education? You will need it for work visa.

How is your Japanese language level? There is a very very slim chance that Japanese companies would hire you instead of native with a same education, unless you have some very special skills in your field that can't be found in Japan.

by kodama (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/15 20:28
I have licenced degree and I'm specializing in Neurology. My boyfriend is already doing the master's degree.
Someone told me that there are not many Physiotherapists in Japan... so I thought it would be easier for me, but right now I see more work proposals for my boyfriend.

We are going to learn Japanese and do the 'Japanese Language Proficiency Test'.

Can someone help me understanting how are these areas (Physiotherapist and electrical engineer) in Japan?

Thanks you!

by Marta (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/15 22:05
There are some jobs that require national license, and I believe that doctors, including physiotherapists, belong to those. I believe that you need to show that your education/training is equal to theone available inJapan, and take a national exam, but I am not sure. In any case, language competency comes first.

by AK (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/16 11:23
If you use the words "physical therapist," people will understand what you mean better.

In any case, to work as a physical therapist in Japan, you'll have to pass the national exam in Japanese. To get to that high level in Japanese language, it'll take 10+years of hard work for average people.

by Tokyonet rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/17 01:35
Physical therapist = Physiotherapist... and in Europe it's more common Physiotherapist, but if you use more Physical Therapist, I don't mind using that term... it's also correct.

About the 'Japanese Language Proficiency Test' I'm well informed with a japanese professor and some other sources... and '10+years of hard work' it's not what it takes to pass the test. With that part I'm well informed.

What I really needed was the answers for the questions I've made:
How do we get work in our areas in there?
Are there any agency that can help us?
How is the salary of an engineer and a Physiotherapist in Japan?

Who can help me with that? I would really appreciate!

by Marta (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/17 09:12
How do we get work in our areas in there?

By applying with proper documentation for open jobs that are related to your education, answer any questions the employer might have and if possible attend the job interview.

You know, the normal procedure to get a new job.

Are there any agency that can help us?

There are several job search sites and agencies. For example gaijinpot.com has job listings. Check them out on the internet.

How is the salary of an engineer and a Physiotherapist in Japan?

I don't know specifically, but generally the starting salary in Japan is not high. I doubt you would get better salary than in Portugal. Probably it would be smaller. Then again the taxes might be lower in Japan, but housing is much much more expensive than in Portugal.

by kodama (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/17 10:17
About the 'Japanese Language Proficiency Test' I'm well informed with a japanese professor and some other sources... and '10+years of hard work' it's not what it takes to pass the test. With that part I'm well informed.

It totally depends on the person, but it will be at least several years of concentrated study for the average student. More specifically you will both probably need N2 equivalent or higher, especially to be able to pass the licensing exams.

How do we get work in our areas in there?

As mentioned, language proficiency will be key. Also, you will need to find out which national licensing exams will be required for the type of work you are interested in. After that its just a matter of applying for jobs.

Are there any agency that can help us?

Find a job or passing the licensing requirements? Yes for finding jobs, not sure about for passing the licensing exams. Either way, Japanese language proficiency will probably be required for both types of services.

How is the salary of an engineer and a Physiotherapist in Japan?

Not sure how it compares to your country, but I believe it is relatively low in Japan. You probably won't become rich even if both of you secure jobs in your respective fields, but you will be able to make a comfortable living.

by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/17 11:08
About the 'Japanese Language Proficiency Test' I'm well informed with a japanese professor and some other sources... and '10+years of hard work' it's not what it takes to pass the test. With that part I'm well informed.

If success on a proficiency test were an indicator of functional language skills, companies wouldn't need translators to do business in Japan...

If you think a few years of language study will bring you to a point where you can effectively practice in your field, then you may need to adjust your expectations.

The electrical engineering would have a better time in this respect because most engineers speak enough English to have basic conversations or write about subjects in their field of study.

As for jobs, "electrical engineer" Japan is a world leader in automotive and power research so electrical engineers will likely always be in demand. However, as a new graduate with no language skills, he might not be very attractive to most companies.

Physiotherapist is an even broader field that ranges from OT/PT management to nursing care to sports. However, you would be dealing with the general population, which on average has no usable English language skills.

by kyototrans rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/17 11:23
We really want to live in Japan.

How do you know? Have you been there before (long enough to experience the real life there)?

by SEA monster rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 04:29
'If success on a proficiency test were an indicator of functional language skills, companies wouldn't need translators to do business in Japan...'
I think you didn't understood what I told... but it doesn't really matter, because like I just said before, I needed help about other issues, and not about 'Japanese Language Proficiency Test', because I'm already well informed about that matter.

About the issues that really matter here: thank you for your help!

About the national licensing exams... I'm already informed too, but thanks for the tip!

I was hoping to get some more substancial information with this post, but I guess I'll continue my research about this subject in other places.

Thank you for who really tried to help.

by Marta (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 09:52
About the national licensing exams... I'm already informed too, but thanks for the tip!

Good to hear. Would you mind posting the info here so that others may benefit from your research?

by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 13:18
The official Japan Physical Therapists' Association website tells you how a foreign physical therapist can get a license in Japan:

http://www.japanpt.or.jp/02_about_pt/about_pt_02.html

by Tokyonet rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 13:30
It is even better in english:
http://www.japanpt.or.jp/09_international/foreign.html

For foreign physical therapists

In order for foreign physical therapists to work in Japan, they must take and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination. With respect to the approval of qualifications required for taking the examination, please carry out the procedures below.

The criteria and procedures for giving approval to the qualifications required for taking the National Examination for Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists according to Article 11, Paragraph 3 and Article 12, Paragraph 3 of the Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists Law (Law No. 137 of 1965) are indicated below.

by The guest guy (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 13:33
I forgot a very important point:

6. Japanese proficiency

Candidates who have not graduated from a junior high school and high school in Japan must have passed Level 1 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.

by The guest guy (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 13:47
Great info! Too bad not every profession is so well documented for foreigners.
by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 14:10
Too bad not every profession is so well documented for foreigners.

I am sorry but should they all make documents available in english? I mean it is Japan and if you want to work in certain fields you should be able to speak and read japanese. Why would Japan Police or JSDF or Doctors make things in english? Do you want to work with japanese public? Speak their language!

Japan is not USA or Canada, it is not a 2 languages country, they speak japanese, you are expected to adapt yourself to them not them to you.

by The guest guy (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 15:08
Slow down, you're getting ahead of yourself. I didn't advocate changing everything to English. In fact, I think Japanese language proficiency is one of the most important requirements for most jobs, and that this should be made clear to prospective workers.

What I am saying is that its nice when some of the basic information is provided in other languages. It makes it clear what is expected to enter the profession, and this will only become increasingly important as certain industries look to fill their labor gap with foreign workers.

by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 15:14
Japan is not USA or Canada, it is not a 2 languages country

FYI, Japan is exactly like the US in that neither country has an official national language.

by ... (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Physiotherapy in Japan 2012/10/18 15:28
FYI, Japan is exactly like the US in that neither country has an official national language.

Well no official language does not mean population is forced to speak chinese, korean, and english to please foreigners.
Last time I visited US for 12 days, I was surprised to see spanish-language channels, magazines...USA seem to be a 2 languages country to me. Japan is not and will not be. Just live with it.

by The guest guy (guest) rate this post as useful

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