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converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/3 13:11
I have a Yamaha Clavinova digital piano model CLP 330PE I imported it from Japan, now in New York.

Its input is AC100V 50/60 Hz, 50W

Is it possible to use a converter to get it to work?

A store here in Manhattan gave a Watson VC-SU50
50 Watt Reverse Voltage Converter - but it doesn't work.
by greg goulding (guest)  

Re: converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/3 14:12
The converter that you bought is for converting 240 down to 110 so it's not gonna work. You need something to convert 110 to 100v like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Kashimura-Converter-110v-130v-Japanese-Products/...

Or if you want to risk it you may just be able to plug the piano directly into the wall. It might just be within the piano's specs, although there is the risk of burning it ou.
by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/4 11:27
Thanks. Plugging in the wall won't work (humming background noise), but the Watson thing is really wrong. But it says:
Input 110/120 VAC 50W output: 220/240 VAC 50/60 Hz. Is that really wrong for the digital piano's specs (AC100V 50/60 Hz) 50W?
by greg (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/4 11:29
Definitely DO NOT use that converter. Sounds like you got the step up version rather than the step down (I have no idea why they number them with the same part number), and plugging it in (which you likely cannot physically do) would probably burn out your piano. Sounds like you need a proper step down converter.
by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

Re: converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/4 13:23
Definitely do not use that converter.
Converter ouput 220`240V and your piano input is 100V, of course it will not work.
Did you explain to the store correctly what you want? If do you should claim for faulty if your piano is broken.
by .. (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: converter for japanese digital piano 2015/2/6 04:47
Hi,
I assume that the hum is because the voltage is just a little bit to high (10V) and the power unit works on its limits.
You might consider to put a resistor in the power cord in series with the piano. Based on the 50W of the piano the resistor needs to be around 20 Ohm (5W). The given wattage of the piano is most likely a maximum and also this fluctuates as result of sound volume etc. So i would go for about a 30 Ohm resistor. As the resistor gets hot you might use a lightbulb for this like a car lightbulb of 5-10W.
Of course you only need to do this when you know what you are doing as you work with high voltages.

Have fun with the piano.
B. Slager
by B. Slager (guest) rate this post as useful

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