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International Postal Money Order Rules? 2017/12/4 15:54
To remit money to the US, I was told to go to the Japanese Post Office and to get an "International Postal Money Order." That's all that's acceptable. No checks and no credit cards can be used.

The instructions clearly say to "keep the counter foil (left-hand side of the Money Order) and send the right-hand side of the Money Order..."

I went to the post office, filled out the papers for an International Postal Money Order, paid my money, and was just about to separate the left side counter foil when the postal employee went nuts. He told me if I removed the left side, the money order would be invalid. To make sure, he got on the phone and called someplace. He was certain that I should not remove the left side.

However, the instructions I received clearly state that I should "keep the counter foil (left-hand side of the Money Order) and send the right-hand side of the Money Order..."

Does anyone have experience using International Postal Money Orders? What's correct??
by Harrison (guest)  

Re: International Postal Money Order Rules? 2017/12/4 17:19
When they say "please detach before presenting for payment," isn't it something the recipient does when he/she takes it to a post office in the US to cash it?
by ... (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: International Postal Money Order Rules? 2018/4/2 18:18
Today I had to have my Japan Post money order reissued because I (this was so dumb..!) Signed the back!! Don't do that. The US government in Japan won't accept your money order. I called them to ask.
Anyway, I had to have it reissued, and before I removed the counterfoil, I asked the guy who was helping me about it, because it does say that, and I had removed it the first time!!

He said absolutely DO NOT REMOVE it yourself.

Here's how it works:
You submit the money order with the counterfoil attached.
The person who you are giving it to (in my case, the US Embassy Passport Division) signs the back and THEY remove the counterfoil. Then they keep it for their records. The larger part, the check, is sent to the Japan Post Bank.
by sofiap (guest) rate this post as useful

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