Korokke

Korokke (コロッケ) are a casual food similar to the French croquette, consisting of breaded, deep fried patties, typically filled with mashed potatoes or cream sauce. They come in a variety of flavors with various additions of vegetables, ground meat or seafood. Some parts of Japan also have their own regional korokke, featuring famous local ingredients such as beef or crab.

Plain potato korokke tend to be shaped into flat oval patties made of mashed potatoes, and might be flavored with ground meat or onions. Many other varieties of potato korokke are sold as well, and are typically named for their flavoring ingredients. For example, popular types include gyu korokke (beef), kabocha korokke (pumpkin), yasai korokke (vegetable) and kare korokke (curry).

Cream korokke typically feature seafood and other ingredients mixed into a thickened cream sauce, and tend to be shaped into small cylindrical patties instead of flat ovals. Cream korokke also come in a wide variety and tend to be named for their ingredients. For example, popular cream korokke include kani kurimu korokke (crab), kon kurimu korokke (corn) and ebi kurimu korokke (shrimp).

Where to find korokke

Korokke are available at some restaurants as part of a set meal or as a side dish for around 1000 yen or less. They can also be bought individually at supermarkets, or wrapped in paper at convenience stores or street vendors. If bought individually, they usually cost between 50 and 300 yen per piece, with cream korokke often slightly more expensive than potato korokke.

How to eat korokke

Korokke are popularly seasoned with a type of Worcestershire sauce that should be available at the table. At restaurants, chopsticks are used to cut off manageable pieces and eat the korokke. Less elegantly, it can also be acceptable to lift the entire piece with your chopsticks and take a bite out of it. If purchased at street vendors, korokke comes wrapped in a paper and can be hold in your hand while being consumed.

Last updated: November 24, 2014
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