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Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/11 17:27
Where can I get this scroll translated?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_WPDT6m37c
by gb (guest)  

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/11 18:32
I can see that the title looks like:
R
depiction of summer holidays in the beautiful mountains@(or at a specific mountain with that name)

but it is Chinese, not Japanese.
by AK rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 01:43
Yes, I think modern Japanese was not used in 1740s yet, only Chinese characters? I hope to find someone to translate. Would Chinese translation result in the same meaning? I thought it was mostly used for phonetics, but I'm probably wrong.
:)
by gb (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 08:14
What I am saying is that this is Chinese language writing, not Japanese :)
If you want a Japanese to decipher it, that would have to be someone versed in "kan-shi" (poems written entirely in Chinese characters only).
by AK rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 10:26
Thank you. Do you know where I can find a kan-shi translator?
by gb (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 10:40
So this is gSummer gateway to the Beautiful Mountainsh (direct translation). I googled it and found out that this is indeed the Chinese paint from the famous Chinese painter named Yuanjiang during the early 18th century.

http://jianbao.artxun.com/shuhua-302913.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuan_Jiang

The modern Japanese like us can understand the meanings of this poem but is hard to translate it precisely. The resolution of the video is not as good, so I cannot make up many characters. Most of these paints use ancient poem, so I googled with some of these sentences, but nothing turned out.

http://baike.baidu.com/view/154912.htm
http://bit.ly/Y5W1Sf

This seems to be a good replica and Yuanjiang is a well-documented painter. So if you research about him, Ifm sure you can find the meaning of this poem in English. Sorry but this is all I can help.



by jomonstrider (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 11:29
Thank you! The previous owner bought it from a Japanese couple in the U.S. and thought it was Japan origin. Thank you for artist info.
1080p video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3crtiT2v1AE
by gb (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation, Old Writing Style 2013/3/12 14:49
I researched some more about Yuanjiang. Many of his works were reproduced by hands in pre-ww2 China for Japanese collectors and it seemed that Yuanjiang es works are very popular. So whoever owned this had re-treated the paint into the Japanese scroll. The original one is in the museum in Beijing.

For what I read from the video, it seems that this is not a poem, but the description of this place. Japanese and Chinese use different grammars and this writing is highly stylized as part of the paints, so I think I can only understand half of the writing.

The beginning probably goes like this: In the beautiful mountains where summer heat doesnft reach, there is the tomb of the First Emperor of Qin, among the lost temples where only hermits livec

After this, itfs pretty much the description of the place, like the view of the bay ships coming in and out. The description on the top and the paint below seem to correspond as you read from right to left.

Now, we know the Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor was only discovered during the 1970fs in rather flat hills. Until then, the tomb was sealed and nobody knew the actual burial. It means that this is the imaginary world created by Yuanjiang. Itfs like the fantasy art from the early 18c, I suppose.

Yuanjiang came from the long line of painterfs family, and he was patronaged by a wealthy salt merchant, before he was introduced to the imperial family of Qing (not Qin) dynasty. So maybe the original paint was to be presented to the imperial family as well? To understand correctly, maybe you should hit the library and look for the History of Arts during the Qing era.
by jomonstrider (guest) rate this post as useful

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