Dear visitor, if you know the answer to this question, please post it. Thank you!

Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/7 17:55
Hi,
Been wanting to climb mt Fuji for several years but never got the chance to do it.

However, I want to give it a try this summer. However, I am thinking a bit about the risk of altitude sickness.

I will probably use the Yoshida trail on a weekday to avoid the crowds. But not sure on what level to stay during the night before night climbing. I get the idea you have a higher chance of getting altitude sickness from staying too high.

First I was thinking of staying slightly above 7th station, but that would mean I need to climb longer in the dark. The 8th station seem to be far above 3000 m.

What would you suggest? Does it really matter that much? I would of course take a long break at the 5th station and several water breaks along the way walking at a slow pace.
by Johhny (guest)  

Re: Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/7 20:02
Acclimatization takes days, not a few hours.

My understanding and a quick search on the internet seems to confirm is "The only reliable treatment, and in many cases the only option available, is to descend."

Basically, if you get it, give up. Your health and life may depend on it.
by JapanCustomTours rate this post as useful

Re: Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/7 21:31
Would staying in a hut at 2400 m the day before help? Or is it still too little?

Seems, if days are needed to adapt to the altitude, wouldnt the rate of climbers getting altitude sickness be rather high?
by Johnny (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/7 22:47
gThis process is known as acclimatization and generally takes 1-3 days at that altitude. For example, if you hike to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), and spend several days at that altitude, your body acclimatizes to 10,000 feet (3,048 meters). If you climb to 12,000 feet (3,658 meters), your body has to acclimatize once again.h

https://www.princeton.edu/~oa/safety/altitude.html

In other words, while the process doesnft necessarily always take days for one specific altitude (though it can), you have to do it all over again when you move. Staying the night at 2,400m may help your body cope with being at that altitude, but the risk of getting sick at 3,700m (summit) is still real.

Professional climbers have weeks to complete ascensions, which is why they are able to deal with it a lot better, and even then they still get sick. Granted they are climbing mountains higher than Fuji, but clearly there is no way to guarantee no altitude sickness with only a day or two on the mountain.
by LIZ (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/8 03:40
So... in other words, it wouldnt matter where along the trail I stay? As long as I rest?

Reading the aclimatization description it seems that altitude sicknes would be very high occurance among the climbers. Is that so? Or have they pushed themselves too hard?

I fear I would wake up with the symptoms in a hut and being kicked out and left in the blue having to climb down in the dark.
by Johnny (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Mt Fuji altitude sickness prevention 2019/1/8 10:58
More than 200,000 people walk up Fuji each climbing season. Most do not suffer altitude sickness.
If you get symptoms, descend.
by JapanCustomTours rate this post as useful

reply to this thread