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Translation 2019/3/12 21:38
Can anyone translate this 2 words lord law please...
If I want to put them together how it would be in Japanese?
by Joao Lazaro (guest)  

Re: Translation 2019/3/13 10:12
can you give the sentence. Since one to one translation is not the best option without knowing the content
by justmyday rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/13 20:37
lord as a title and law as a ruler.
Do you understand what I mean?
by lord law rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/13 21:17
Lord like for an English Lord or the Japanese equivalent in history of a lord? An English lord would be: roodo ロード, same writing as for road though.

Law, can be translated as houritsu, but there are other translations as well. Houritsu 法律 (ほうりつ) is law in a legal sense.

If this is going to be a tattoo or something like that, stay away from these translations.
by LikeBike (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/13 23:01
lord as a Japanese equivalent in history and law as a ruler.

Its for a logo
by lord law rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/14 00:27
lord as a Japanese equivalent in history and law as a ruler.

I'm a professional translator, and I don't understand what you mean. (It would make a little more sense if it were "lord as a ruler".)

In any case, translating a logo is not easy and is very risky. You would want to hire someone experienced in copy-writing or a friend you can truly trust. If it's a friend, you can accept any mistakes for friendship. Regardless, to translate a logo, you need to have a meeting and learn all he history and concept that goes with that logo.
by Uco rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/14 11:20
「lord as a Japanese equivalent in history and law as a ruler.」
That's the thing, though - there's no one set "Japanese equivalent in history" for "lord." Even under the idea of "a person who controls a territory," Japanese uses different words depending on what the specific area is (a village? a castle? a fief? a country?), whether said area is in Japan or another country, and whether that control is based on official, legal power or implied, coercive influence.

Daimyo ruled Japanese fiefs. Shogun ruled the country by military force. Tenno rule Japan through systematic inheritance. O rule kingdoms, generally in Europe. Joshu ruled castles, in the sense that they were the owners.

As for "law as a ruler," laws aren't rulers, they're rules, and once again, depending on the specific type of rule, Japanese uses different words (a rule enforced by a legal system? a constant phenomena in science? a naturally repeating behavior in an economic model?).
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/15 23:45
Well, that is really interesting. thank you. Well I went to google translator xD and when I search law it also come out with this


So I was wondering if it makes any sense if I put this together 命辟
by lord law rate this post as useful

Re: Translation 2019/3/16 02:44
So I was wondering if it makes any sense if I put this together 命辟

No. And my Google translator does not give me 辟 for "law". I also don't understand how you came up with 命.
by Uco rate this post as useful

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