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Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/22 11:20
Is it is possible?
As I live in the UK so when I turn 18 I enter Uni and to have a degree in forensics it takes 3-4 years, and i plan to stay in the UK for 2 years to work,

so when I do decide to move to Japan is it possible that they would accept me to work as a forensic there?
by Oli (guest)  

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/22 14:51
"Forensic" is too vague. What kind of job do you want to do exactly?
by ... (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/22 15:18
And what is your Japanese skill level?
by LikeBike (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/22 17:12
Answer is no, a foreigner cannot do any public service in Japan.
This include, city hall, police, fireman, ambulance, army etc.

You can do when you became Japanese and give up your nationality.
You would also need to have native level speaking and writing ability.



by justmyday rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/22 19:37
If finances and university allows - try a semester of university in Japan before saying "I want to work in Japan". Apologies for the negative comment - we get a lot of people who want to move to Japan for <<insert changeable reason>> and i want to say something positive without dashing hopes. I don't know enough about the comment above but I would not be surprised....
by mfedley rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/23 00:19
By your timetable, you'd be 23 or 24, with two years of work experience, and hoping to get a job as a forensic scientist in Japan. That'd be pretty difficult to pull off.

Two years isn't that much experience, so unless you'd managed to build an extra-impressive resume (compared to other forensic scientists), you probably wouldn't have too many Japanese municipalities offering you jobs that they could fill with locally hired Japanese applicants instead. And that's assuming you speak/read/write fluent Japanese, not just for everyday conversations, but specifically the vocabulary and grammar you need to discuss forensic science, and, by relation, law/crime.

Two other factors would make the career path you described especially difficult. First, while crimes do happen in Japan, the extremely low crime rate means that there isn't the same demand for people who work in the criminology field, especially when it comes to roles that are performed after a crime has taken place (like forensics).

Second, a lot of technical/scientific jobs in Japan that hire foreigners are jobs that require some sort of coordination with overseas organizations. Foreign engineers get hired because a lot of Japanese companies work on infrastructure projects outside of Japan too, or produce products for export. That means having to communicate with overseas subsidiaries, suppliers, banks, governments, etc. That need for overseas coordination also means that those jobs can be a little more flexible in terms of the applicant's Japanese language skill level. A foreign software engineer or financial analyst who's working in Japan might be a little shaky speaking Japanese , for example, and that itself is a drawback, but when he can use English to easily communicate with overseas teams who're involved in the project, that's a plus.

Unfortunately, working in forensic science in Japan means the people/organizations you'll be coordinating with are Japanese government and law enforcement institutions, and so your non-Japanese language skills aren't really going to count for anything, so they won't offset the drawback of less-than-fluent Japanese skills.

I'm not saying to give up on your dream, but if your plan is to get hired as a foreign forensic scientist based on two years of work experience and a moderate command of the language, that's probably not going to happen.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/24 21:33
Focus on getting a forensic science degree first, then a job in the UK. You may find the demand for jobs seriously outweighs the availability of positions. Also, you'll quickly realise that forensic investigation isn't what crap TV shows make it out to be.

As someone with a forensic investigation degree, a Japanese degree, and a 17 yr career I wish you all the best.
by Sal1980 rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/28 10:00
Technically, yes. If you can speak Japanese at a native level, no even more advanced than that, and pass their exam. It also means you must study at a Japanese university and pass their tests, and receive their degree.

Look. I think you are better off just getting a decent career in the UK and travel to Japan for vacation. If you are adamant on living in Japan and working there, you will have a long way to go. And who knows if you have what it takes to handle forensic classes. Choosing a major is one thing, finishing it is another.
by OopsieDaisie (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/28 11:03
Technically, yes.

Not going to happen. No chance.
forensic scientist in Japan = NPA (National Police Agency) = civil servants = Japanese citizens only.
by P.O. (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Can i become a forensic scientist in Japan? 2019/5/29 13:08
I do not understand why people say it is possible.
It is not an office-, teaching nor manufacturing job.

Foreigners working in Japan without a Japanese Nationality do not have the ability to work in fields as army, policy, fireman etc.

The best you can become is security person with low access level. This include street guidance etc.
It is the same as in other countries without having the nationality you cannot work in the above fields.

There is an exchange possible to corporate between countries to solve cases, but not working actually in Japan.
by justmyday rate this post as useful

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