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Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/13 20:23
I am fourteen years old and live in the UK, I know Russian and English fluently and am learning Japanese (currently N4 level) and I have been wanting to live in Japan for quite a while now, I have watched every cons video about Japan that there is and try to make myself have as much of a realistic view of the country as possible, and am working hard to learn the culture etc.
I have made myself a little plan of how I want to educate myself there and I would like to know any tips, any things I should really consider, and if it is really possible.
What I thought is that after sixth form I will take a gap year and live in Japan for about 2-3 months to get used to the country and understand what it is like, and then take the rest of the year working to get as much money as possible, (I'm also getting a job next year too) so my parents won't have to pay much. I wanted to either take a MEXT scholarship or something else to study something like coding in university in Japan, so I will be able to get used to the country but still have quite a demanding subject.
Later I want to get a job related to the subject I did and earn as much possible to then later go into medicine at Uni again( the main thing I wanted to study), then later find a job related to it.
I decided that I shouldn't do medicine first since it will be a big toll on me to learn the vocabulary for medicine, and the subject itself, so I thought I could study the vocabulary during the first degree and get ready for it.
What do you think about this? I don't mind it being challenging but are there any jobs which would suit me for it too?
by hiow  

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 12:39
It sounds like quite an ambitious plan – pursuing a coding degree, then later study medicine?? (Before that, youfd need to learn the languagec) Firstly please see if a job related to coding would earn you that much that you can save enough to go to medical school later. Studying medicine in Japan takes six years, and entrance exam to get into such college isnft easy, it costs a lot of money, and even after graduation the initial years starting out as a doctor isnft easy (canft earn much). Of course youfd need to be fluent in the Japanese languagec

Till you finish your sixth form (by then youfd be 18 I guess?), study all subjects, learn the Japanese language on the side, and see how things go.
by AK rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 14:21
Learning medicine-related vocabulary isnft anywhere near the most difficult part of your plan. For someone genuinely fluent (you would need to be to even consider studying medicine in Japan), it is actually not going to be that difficult. Challenging for sure, but very achievable. So if the only reason you want to study programming is to avoid learning some difficult Japanese words for now, I say donft bother. Only study programming if that is what you actually want to do. Also most programmers donft make that much in Japan. Enough to live on a build a decent life for sure, but they are not what I would consider rich to the point that they can just decide to enrol in medical school. And frankly most people I know who have worked as programmers and in other IT fields in Japan are busy and tired. They donft have the kind of lifestyle that would facilitate studying the Japanese language to the point where entering medical school would be possible.
by LIZ (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 16:16
since you are young, you may not know the reality.

1. if you want to become a medical doctor, you should do it in your country. it is the easiest way. if you expect that you can't do in your country, then again, you can't do in Japan.
2. you have to know the difference of student lives between Japan and other civilized countries. in Japan, high school students mostly enter universities with no gap term. so, there is almost no such life styles that they work, for a while, to save money for university tuition.
3. you underestimate the language barrier, especially if you want to be a medical doctor. if you are IT engineer, you may work with less knowledge of Japanese language, because programming is written in English. but, if you want to be a medical doctor in Japan, a doctor does not need to know English, because patients are Japanese.
4. the medical doctor program is extremely competitive in Japan. your sore should be the top of one thousand or ten thousands.
by ken (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 17:11
Sorry I'm not quite sure how to reply to people on this website however,
@AK Thank you for your reply, I do really agree that it's so ambitious, at the moment I have a Japanese tutor and hopefully doing the N4 exam in the summer (if Covid allows me lol), but I do agree that I really do just need to do my best in all subjects, work hard and then see what I will be like then.
I was thinking to do something like coding but I can do anything else since I'm not really passionate at anything but I can do a lot of stuff well.
About the money, I want to earn as much as I can myself but if I am really desperate I can ask my parents since we have a normal relationship. I will look at coding jobs! I'm not sure if later I will do medicine then since it does sound so hard.. I don't think I will be better than average around Japanese students but who knows...

by hiow rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 17:17
Thank you @LIZ for your answer!
I didn't know that coding was such a tiring subject so thank you for telling me! I'm the best at coding in my GCSE class, but I don't think it means anything as there are others which are much more talented around the country. I like the subject but yeah.. I don't think I want to do it super badly.
I don't mind living on average pay since I don't eat much or buy much, but as long as I live moderately decent low wage isn't too much of a worry for me.
So do you think I should either take a different subject or not do the first degree at all?
by hiow rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/14 17:24
@ken Thank you for your answer!
1. I think I could do it in my own country, but I don't really want to do things easily. But is it so hard that I should just scrap the idea all together?
2. Ah I see, so would it not be possible for me to go to university at all if I take a gap year? I just heard that in medical school in Japan there are some students who are even 50 years old.
3.I wanted to study Japanese thoroughly for the 4-5 years I have ( and the 2 years I studied before), so I thought my Japanese would develop quite well, since I have a tutor and I talk to some of my Japanese friends over the phone and in real life.
4. That is what I worried about the most, since that is what I see the most about. I study biology and chemistry in my spare time and learn from my brother etc about medicine, but I agree that there are probably a lot of students my age who probably know the whole curriculum
by hiow rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/15 11:19
you are 14 years old.
in Japan, 15 years old students take the examination for entering high school in March (or February).
here is the examples of examinations in Tokyo, mathematics and sciences. (both are universal subjects. you can answer them, if you have knowledge.)
math:
https://resemom.jp/feature/public-highschool-exam/tokyo/2020/math/ques...
science:
https://resemom.jp/feature/public-highschool-exam/tokyo/2020/science/q...

can you understand the questions ?
can you answer them ?
if you want to enter medical school after graduating high school, probably your score in this high school examination should be 90% or more for the average of all subjects, Japanese, English, society, science, and math.
by ken (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/15 11:24
Who knows what jobs will be available in 8-10 years. Uber wasn't around 12 years ago. The pandemic has made new jobs that weren't thought of before 2020. Do what you must and study. Don't worry about what jobs may be available in a decade.
by . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/15 14:45
@ken Thank you!!! I'll try it out soon
by hiow rate this post as useful

Re: Tips on jobs in Japan 2021/1/15 15:10
Thank you @LIZ for your answer!
I didn't know that coding was such a tiring subject so thank you for telling me! I'm the best at coding in my GCSE class, but I don't think it means anything as there are others which are much more talented around the country. I like the subject but yeah.. I don't think I want to do it super badly.
I don't mind living on average pay since I don't eat much or buy much, but as long as I live moderately decent low wage isn't too much of a worry for me.
So do you think I should either take a different subject or not do the first degree at all?


Coding isn't necessarily inherently hard or tiring. I am not a programmer myself but I do work with web developers a lot since my field is (mostly) online marketing. I know programmers in the UK who have relatively easy lives as far as work/life balance is concerned. But Japan is a totally different story. If you don't know much about work culture in Japan you should definitely research it yourself, but long hours and lots of unpaid overtime (even if it's not technically allowed) is common. The developers I know in Japan definitely don't have the time, energy, or money to prepare for medical school while also mastering a very difficult foreign language.

As for whether you should choose a different subject or not I can't really answer that for you. Do you definitely want to study medicine? How badly? Do you want to study medicine more than you want to live in Japan? If living in Japan is the ultimate goal then there are definitely much, much easier ways to do that. In fact I would argue that studying medicine is one of the most difficult entry routes into the country. Becoming a doctor is hard in any country, becoming a doctor in Japan as a foreigner is extremely difficult though. Not only do you have to get into medical school, pass medical school (you are already at a disadvantage in both of these things since you are not a native speaker of Japanese), you also need to land a job upon graduation. This is likely to be far more difficult than you think. The market for foreign medical professionals is tiny. Frankly, most Japanese people do not want to see a foreign doctor. Whether that is right or wrong, it is a fact that nobody can dispute. And most doctors who cater to non-Japanese speaking foreign residents are probably bilingual Japanese.

These are things you need to consider. Unfortunately compromises often have to be made. When I was about your age I was torturing myself over the decision between studying business and art. I couldn't do both. If we are being completely realistic then I have to tell you that it is unlikely that you will be able to become a doctor and live in Japan. Not impossible, but definitely not likely to happen. I think you should consider what is most important to you.

One thing I think is certain: a degree in programming will not help you become a doctor.
by LIZ (guest) rate this post as useful

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