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Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/12 15:05
Hello! I'm very interested in artist visa.

I am a singer and self-produced artist with more than 50 million streams on music streaming services, 200 singles released, albuns, several awards as a singer and I earn an income of $4000 minimum monthly of royalties. All this experience, singing and recording japanese songs. Already have 15 years of experience and enough proof of my work. Don't have a degree, but basic japanese conversation skills.

All my content and creation, comes directly from Japan culture. I already have contact with some labels, artists and studios, but never touched the subject: "hey, can you get me a visa?" because I feel that would be impolite.

I don't have an stable condition in my country, to develop skills and opportunities, and would like to get an artist visa, receiving income from U.S and royalties, being a resident in Japan.

Do you know if it's possible to apply? Do I have any chances? Or should I try a student visa and apply for artist visa later, maybe, with a major label?
by Wilson (guest)  

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/13 07:45
Of course you can apply. You can demonstrate income and track-record/history.
by JapanCustomTours rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/13 11:55
Are you trying to apply for an artist visa for working as a business, or to apply for a company to sponsor it for you? You should first check the requirements of the visa online, that might give a better indication as to what you want to do.

In regards to a student visa, I'm not sure why you would want to go through that whole process to spend time and money which you need to be selected into a school and then pay for the school, only to then change the visa, which isn't always easy to do. If you have a student visa and then you suddenly just try to change it, there is a risk they won't allow you to do so as it's not your original intention in Japan.

Just be sure you know what you want to do.
by Tom (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/13 18:36
Use those contacts you claim you have to get sponsored.

It will be much easier than proving you have enough income and saving to support yourself.
by H (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/13 23:37
uDo you know if it's possible to apply? Do I have any chances?v
It is, of course, possible to apply. How good your chances are of your application actually being approved, though, is a different matter.

Off the top of my head, there are a couple of things in your story that look like they could be potential issues.

1.
uAlready have 15 years of experiencev
I could be wrong about this, but the sense I have is that experience doesnft provide the same advantage in visa applications for artists/entertainers as it does for technical or more business-oriented jobs. I could, however, be wrong about this.

2.
uI am a singer and self-produced artist with more than 50 million streams on music streaming servicesv
uAll this experience, singing and recording japanese songsv
uDon't have a degree, but basic japanese conversation skills.v

I might not be putting the pieces together correctly here, and I apologize if thatfs the case, but if youfre singing songs in Japanese, but donft speak the language beyond gbasic conversationh level, Ifm guessing that youfre singing covers of Japanese artistsf songs, not songs of your own creation, and monetizing your streams/selling recordings of those covers.

If so, the immigration bureau may or may not see that as legitimate work experience/prof that you can financially support yourself while living in Japan. Regardless of your level of talent, they might doubt your ability to support yourself while living in Japan, where unlicensed covers of Japanese songs are more likely to attract legal action from the songsf rights holders.

3.
uwould like to get an artist visa, receiving income from U.S and royalties, being a resident in Japan.v
This might be the biggest issue. Generally, a major requirement for visas is that the activity is something that needs to be done in Japan and/or that Japan will benefit from.

If right now youfre singing for customers/listeners in the U.S., the immigration bureau is going to wonder why you need to be in Japan to do that. If your plan is to just keep doing the same thing youfve been doing up until now, just while living in Japan, theyfre likely to deem residence in Japan to be non-essential for you. So youfll need to be able to explain, likely in concrete terms, why you need to be in Japan to sing, or how your being in Japan while youfre singing is going to provide a benefit for Japan/Japanese people.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/14 11:08
Hey! I appreciate everyone answering me. I'm gonna answer a couple of questions:

- I do sing cover songs, but all of them are licensed. Original artists also recognize and share with their fans those interpretations.
- I gave an interview to NHK a couple years ago, where they have praised my work and I explained the bond between original creations and cover songs.
- I also have original songs in Japanese, supported by local labels.
- I currently live in Brazil, which is very different from U.S. I don't have enough opportunities and basic conditions to live here. Also, since I sing in Japanese, almost all of my listeners are in Japan.
- Unfortunately, never had the opportunity to study japanese, but incredibly, I know how to sing with enough pronunciation. If I visit Japan one day, expect to take a course and develop my conversation skills.
- I understand that technical proof of my work is needed. Numbers, prizes, recognition, etc. And I have enough of them.

This is my first time talking about it in a forum or something, since everyone here is so kindly and helpful. For sure, I'm in contact with Japanese Embassy in my country, they will guide correctly, but it's awesome if anyone here could share their experiences.

Thank you very much!
by Wilson (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/15 12:14
I don't have enough opportunities and basic conditions to live here. Also, since I sing in Japanese, almost all of my listeners are in Japan.



uAlso, since I sing in Japanese, almost all of my listeners are in Japan.v
In your original post, you said you "would like to get an artist visa, receiving income from U.S and royalties, being a resident in Japan." So are you saying that you currently live in Brazil, earn a living singing for listeners/customers in Japan, and want to move to Japan in order to increase the amount of income you earn from the U.S.?

uI don't have enough opportunities and basic conditions to live here.v
What do you mean by "not having basic conditions to live [in Brazil]?" In your original post, you also said "I don't have an stable condition in my country," which makes it sound as though you're having a difficult time earning a living as a singer in your home country. If that's the case, the immigration bureau is likely to be concerned about whether or not you'll be able to earn a living for yourself while in Japan, since you'll have to deal with the added challenges of adapting to a new culture/society/language at the same time.

I'm not trying to discourage you from pursuing your goal of living in Japan, but generally three things the immigration bureau really want to know regarding work visa applications are:
1. Can you support yourself with this job?
2. Do you have to be in Japan in order to do this job?
3. Does Japan benefit from you doing this job in Japan?

If you already have an unstable living condition in your home country, they might be worried about Question #1, and if you're hoping to "receive income from the U.S.," they might wonder about Questions 2 and 3, so you'll increase your chances of getting a visa if you can form some concrete answers to them.

Also, I don't think this has been addressed in the thread, but I believe what musicians working in Japan usually have isn't an "artist" visa, but an "entertainer" one. In many cases, they obtain these visas in connection with an offer of employment, such as from a music club, bar, theme park, etc. However, since you said you're not trying to obtain a visa through a recording label or studio, it sounds like what you're hoping to do is obtain a visa to come to Japan and work as a self-producing singer. That makes answering the three questions mentioned above even more important.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/15 13:31
[So are you saying that you currently live in Brazil, earn a living singing for listeners/customers in Japan, and want to move to Japan in order to increase the amount of income you earn from the U.S.?]

I live in Brazil, earn a living singing in Japanese, and want to move to Japan, in order to have a safe environment to develop new connections with my main source of income.

[What do you mean by "not having basic conditions to live [in Brazil]?]

My condition is Brazil is not related to my earnings, but country politics and a safe environment. Artists in general don't have any support. For example, my equipment has been robbed so many times, because it's a normal thing here. I feel more encouraged to delve into this artist life if I can focus on my work, and not being shot next door. If you Google about Brazil work conditions and safety, you will understand.

Most of streaming services like Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music and etc, are originally from U.S, so it doesn't matter where I live, my income will come from there. This music business model is kinda complicated, but it's possible to see more artists worldwide making a living with royalties and streaming.

But, quick answering your questions:
1. Can you support yourself with this job?
Yes, I can live anywhere and have enough earnings to do it.

2. Do you have to be in Japan in order to do this job?
As I stated above, I can live anywhere to do this job. But, my contribution to Japan culture would increase significantly if I'm living there.

3. Does Japan benefit from you doing this job in Japan?
I'm like a bridge between Japan and overseas. Being physically connected to the source of my creation is something that must happen, so I can grow as an artist and deliver content worldwide with more finesse via internet.
by Wilson (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/15 15:05
Ifm genuinely only saying this because I donft want you to go to all the effort of applying only to be disappointed when your application is rejected, but your answers arenft compelling at all to me personally, and I donft think any immigration official is going to see things any differently. Admitting that you can continue your work outside of Japan is a problem, and the benefits you can offer Japan are, I think, probably not in line with what they are looking for.

Honestly probably the best advice anyone is going to give you is this: get a good immigration lawyer, explain your situation, and ask if they can make a rock solid case for you gaining residency in Japan. To be frank, I think it is going to be really difficult, but if you do succeed then it is almost certainly going to be with the help of a professional so yeah, thatfs what I recommend doing.

Otherwise, go as a student. Getting accepted by a school and immigration is easy enough if you are genuine about your willingness to learn. And if you want to benefit Japan culturally in any way at all you are going to need to be able to speak (and preferably read and write) Japanese. You could potentially reach a passable level in a couple of years of language school. Perhaps this is a more realistic option for now.
by LIZ (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/15 18:14
I agree with the above LIZ's post, (and another her lost post which was erased probably by the site administrator).
it is wisdom to hear sincerely other person's advises even when those are inconvenient for you.

what you want to do seems for me to be that you fight against immigration with no knowledge about what is immigration (and immigration system).
by ken (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/15 19:31
My knowledge on the intricacies of immigration law are not my strong point - but as a layman I do see a problem. Correct me if I'm wrong.

(1) You wish to move to Japan
(2) You are financially independent
(3) Your work can be completed at any location with an internet connection - but improving your Japanese will be helpful in the long run.

I totally understand your wish to move to Japan - but the immigration question of "why do you need to be in Japan to complete your profession" I don't think has been answered.

Could moving to Japan as a student to learn the language be helpful? Absolutely! To fully immerse yourself into Japanese culture - being able to read and write makes a huge difference. Others who have been more successful in this can talk about this on the forum in more detail.

Something I would also check up on is the legality of singing covers in Japan. I do not say to know that I know the answer to this question - but I will say that Japanese law is very different than what we are used to.

If interested - it might also be a good idea to see if anyone has come to Japan on this forum as a language student and then settled down in Japan.

Best of luck with your journey.
by mfedley rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/16 00:37
uMy condition is Brazil is not related to my earnings, but country politics and a safe environment...my equipment has been robbed...I feel more encouraged to delve into this artist life if I can focus on my work, and not being shot next door.v

This, honestly, is probably going to be a problem for immigration. While I sympathize with your plight, this part of your desire to move to Japan boils down to "I want to get away from the situation in Brazil." Japan isn't even a particularly accommodating country in terms of granting visas to war refugees or people from other countries seeking political asylum. High crime rates in Brazil probably aren't going to sway them to give you a visa, especially since, compared to Japan, just about every country on earth has higher crime rates.

uMost of streaming services like Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music and etc, are originally from U.Sv
u I can live anywhere to do this job.v

This, also, might be a problem. If your income is coming from U.S.-based companies/customers, and you can do the job outside of Japan, immigration is more likely to feel like there's no need for you to be in Japan to do your job. While you mention that you feel you could do your job better in Japan than in Brazil because of crime/safety concerns, immigration might think that there are other countries with lower crime levels than Brazil that would also provide you with that benefit, and so you don't need to come to Japan specifically.

Since it doesn't sound like you need to be in Japan to do your job, your application is more likely to hinge on whether Japan benefits from you living in the country, and you might need something more substantial, or at least concrete, than saying that your music will be a bridge between Japan and other countries. So I agree with the others above who've suggested contacting an immigration lawyer.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Artist Visa - 15 Years Experience 2022/4/17 07:34
Before you even think of moving on a visa, please consider the tax in Japan.

https://juanitofatas.com/japanese/japanese-tax

If you agree with their taxing system, Japan would benefit a lot. If you receive money from a publisher I suggest you look for Sweeden based label to pay royalties. Receiving payment from Sweeden, would mean 0 tax retained on the double taxation avoidance policy, as Japan and Sweeden have such an agreement. This would mean you pay your taxes to the country you would have fiscal residency, be it Japan, it would profit from you staying there. This is a strong argument but the topic is far more complicated now with the Covid border policy.

Before COVID there was a 6-12 month visa I wanted to apply for. A tourist visa but more like "Long term relaxation visa". If you can prove you have a deposit of 30 million yen in your bank account, you're eligible. I even bought a house in Kyoto and renovate it over the internet, but that visa is not yet available and most likely it won't be. A perfect visa. Which get me to the point I was trying to make with taxes. As my income is from abroad, getting taxed in Japan(as a resident) would reduce my annual income to half, which is why I was looking for a visa where I can stay in Japan longer than a tourist, spend my money, but be taxed in my home country.


by MirceaM rate this post as useful

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