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company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 05:31
I am interested in studying at an international high school in Japan. I noticed that most of the gcheaperh ones require you have a guardian in Japan which I do not have. So I was wondering is there a company that will act as your guardian while in Japan? I know this is an oddly specific question and a bit weird but I wasnft sure where else to ask. I tried googling it and only found a company that offers this service to Japanese students studying in the UK. Also kinda similar an extension to that question, is there any companies that offer homestays for teenagers? I know of some homestay companies but they are obviously aimed at adult travelers, I am interested in ones for international high school students. There are some schools with dorms but if possible I would rather not stay in one. What Ifm looking for might not exist because Japan doesnft have a big market of international students but I thought if I didnft ask then I would never know. Thank you in advance for any help!
by Rachelcookie  

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 09:11
No such company.

Better off doing an exchange program.
by H (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 10:32
If you need ghome stayh and a guarantor/guardian, you should look for an exchange program with a Japanese high school (not with an ginternational schoolh in Japan, that would defeat the purpose of an exchange program!) - check with your high school if they have any exchange program with a school in Japan.
by AK rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 13:24
uI am interested in studying at an international high school in Japan. I noticed that most of the gcheaperh ones require you have a guardian in Japan which I do not have.v
If you're high school age, you're, for legal purposes, a minor, and so all schools, even the more expensive ones, will require you to have a guardian. It's just that in the case of expensive boarding schools, the school itself is acting as your guardian.

But if what you're looking for is a contracted service where a company, in exchange for a fee, agrees to be your legal guardian but then lets you live by yourself (i.e. have your own apartment) while living in Japan, then no, there aren't any such services that I'm aware of. That kind of arrangement would likely be seen as fraudulent by the Japanese legal system, since being the guardian of a minor is supposed to entail close supervision and monitoring, not just showing up to help them when they get into trouble.

uAlso kinda similar an extension to that question, is there any companies that offer homestays for teenagers?v
Yes, there are many organizations that offer homestay programs for teens. Not all of them are though for-profit companies, and are instead through academic or international exchange societies, but yes, they do exist.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 17:24
I am not looking to do an exchange program as I am looking to finish my studies in Japan. So for that, an international school would be my only option.

When I say a company that will act as a guardian I mean they will actually act as guardian not just say they will and then leave me alone. So then I could stay at a school dorm or a homestay.

I also thought about something else that might be easier. Is there maybe a way for me to find an individual who would act as my guardian and as a homestay? Even though it wouldnft be much effort, schools donft seem to do homestays even though they could do it with just local families for a low price. Most schools in New Zealand (where I live) offer homestays for international students coming to NZ to finish their studies. So anyway, is there maybe a way for me to find an individual who would be willing to make an agreement to offer this service (paid obviously)? I know some friends in Japan but it would feel rude to ask them.
by Rachelcookie rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 18:24
Another important point: there would be no visa category for entering Japan in your situation – you will need to be accepted by the school, first of all, to gain sponsorship from the school to help you with the visa application, but it is not that your parents are moving to Japan with their work or something, meaning you have no particular reason why you gneed toh come to Japan.

About guardian: Well if you have friends but would feel rude to ask them, wouldnft it be ruder to ask strangers.
I mean, being a gguardianh means the full responsibility equal to that of your parents, that is a lot that you are looking for. They would need to cover your living expenses, school tuitions, etc. too, as gguardians.h Also, trying to come to Japan to finish up your high school education in English (obviously), not in your own country, simply doesnft make sense. There would be no reason to promote such wishes – your wish sounds like just wishing to experience living in Japan but without the associated efforts (like learning the language), no international cultural exchange so to say, that no organization would be interested in supporting you.

Also please look into the cost of attending an international school in Japan; it is quite expensive.
The reason why they require you to have guardian(s) is because those are intended for the children of people living here in Japan.
Also, trying to do just one last year of a high school wouldnft help much with your career/further education prospects, as students in senior year would start planning for (or already have some ideas) preferred college courses, and you might not have any idea yet.

I suggest you finish your high school education in your country, and at the same time start to look for a way to attend a university in Japan that is maybe taught in English. Or if you want to learn the local language and study, you can think of attending a language school.
by AK rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 19:48
Look, I didnft want to get into this because I just wanted a straightforward answer but right now going to an international school in Japan is my only option to finish my education. I donft want to go into the details because itfs long and personal but finishing school in my country is not an option for me. Neither is it to finish it in another country. It is far from ideal, but this is really my only option. I have been learning Japanese and initially I had wanted to go exchange for a year to Japan but I couldnft because of covid and now itfs too late unless I want to graduate at like 19 which I donft. I have chosen an international school because my Japanese is not good enough to go to a regular japanese high school and graduate with good grades. Also, from my understanding you have to complete all three years of high school in Japan to be able to graduate. In the matter of visa, I have found international schools which will sponsor students to come to Japan to finish their education so that is not a problem. I think it would be rude to ask friends to stay with because this sort of thing is either best done with someone you are very close to or a stranger wefre you can come from a purely business point if few. I know international schools are very expensive but again, itfs really my only option. I am not looking for suggestions for other options, this is all rather personal for me so I donft want to get into it, I know it might be hard to believe that it is truly my only option but I have looked into it a lot and trust me, itfs far from my first choice. Itfs not ideal but itfs all I have. I will just have to find a way to try make the money. I am not some weeb trying to fo to Japan to live out my anime dreams, I am doing this for educational purposes. This is my best chance of getting a good education and being able to go to a good university. I already know what I want to do in life and what I need to study to get there. I already started doing so at my school in New Zealand. I donft know why you would assume I hadnft and that would be a problem.

Sorry, for the format, I am just too tired to spend time organising it all properly. I just wanted to avoid having to explain myself because itfs personal and I just want straight forward answers to my questions and not suggestions on alternatives. If I wanted that then I would of asked for that. Ifve already looked into every option you can think of so therefs no point in suggesting it because I looked at it already over a year ago and realised itfs not an option for me. I have my reasons and people who know me well understand my reasons as legitimate and know this is my only option so you donft need to worry about that. All I want is this information. I have everything else handled.
by Rachelcookie rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 20:57
u I just wanted to avoid having to explain myself because itfs personal and I just want straight forward answers v
I'm sorry that you're not getting the answers in as straightforward a manner as you'd like. However, the less we know about your situation, the harder it is to give straightforward answers. I realize you'd like to maintain a certain level of privacy in describing your situation, and that's your prerogative, but that also means it might take a few more steps to get to the information you want.

Specifically I think this combination is making it hard for us to give you the straightforward answers you're looking for.
uSo I was wondering is there a company that will act as your guardian while in Japan?v
ugoing to an international school in Japan is my only option to finish my educationv

It's hard for us to understand how these aspects fit together. If you're looking for a person or entity to act as your guardian in Japan, then it's safe for us to assume that your parents will not be going to Japan with you, right? So if your parents are staying in New Zealand, why is it not possible for you to finish your education in New Zealand? And if they're leaving New Zealand for another country that's not Japan, and you're still a minor/their dependent, why is coming to Japan your only option to finish your education?

I realize you said you don't want to discuss these things, and we can't force you to. But without knowing those things, we can't offer much in the way of advice, because the specifics of your situation will affect your options.

You said you don't want to do an exchange program, and you don't want to go to a boarding school. So essentially what you're trying to do is simply enroll as a Japanese resident at an international school in Japan. That's something that is possible, but it's usually based on a need to do so. For example, if a teenager's parents are moving to Japan because of their work, it's easy for the teen to get a visa. They're still a dependent, so they need to move to Japan too, and while they're in Japan they need to get an education, so enrollment in an international school is simple (if expensive).

In your case, though, your parents aren't moving to Japan, so immigration is going to wonder if you
-need- to study in Japan, or just want to. Especially if you're specifically trying to go to an international school, which by its very nature is meant to be closer to an overseas school than regular Japanese schools, immigration will wonder "Why aren't you just going to school in your own country?"

That's why people are asking why you want to do this. Not to pry, but because the answer affects what options are and aren't open to you.

Unfortunately, the original thing you're looking for, a service where you pay someone to agree to be your legal guardian, doesn't exist. Since that option is a no-go, we're trying to think of other ways you could study in Japan. Going to a boarding school for high school is the easiest, but you said you don't want to live in a dorm. Waiting until you're no longer a minor (i.e. after high school) and coming to Japan as a university student (either through general admission application or an exchange program), is another option, as is going to language school in Japan, but you said you need to do your last year of high school at an international school in Japan.

Unless we know why you're against living in a dorm and why you need to do your last year of high school at an international school in Japan, all we can say is "Nope, you can't pay someone to be your guardian." We'd like to be more helpful than that, but with the information you've provided us, that's about all we can say.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 22:04
I appreciate your friendly answer.
A straightforward answer from me, without getting too into the details would be to say that in New Zealand I have not been academically challenged at school which has lead me to lose motivation and not be able to complete my work. This is just how the education system is designed in New Zealand so at any school here there would be the same result. Honestly, I do have lots of trauma from this country so I donft really feel comfortable living or going to school here anymore either. I can not go to school in most other countries because they require you to study there for multiple years before you can graduate which I donft have time for. Other countries are just not somewhere I would feel comfortable living or their education system doesnft seem like it will work for me. I wanted to go to Japan anyway so it makes sense I try go there for my education opposed to an international school in another country. The education will be in English anyway so it doesnft matter. I would theoretically be going alone because my parents cannot get jobs and uplift our whole life to move our family there.

I could in theory stay in a dorm but I would just be a lot more comfortable in a home environment. The idea of staying in a dorm gives me lots of anxiety, It would also allow me to experience the Japanese culture more if I stay with a Japanese family which I wouldnft really get to do at an international school.

Ideally I would of loved to study at a Japanese high school, their education system fits me perfectly but sadly that is not realistic with my Japanese ability and I do not have time to spare to go on student exchange anymore.

I hope that that gives enough explanation. Sorry if I was a bit defensive, I am just used to people dismissing me as naive and thinking that Ifm living in a fantasy land when in reality, itfs far from it. Sometimes I can be a bit too realistic with my views.
by Rachelcookie rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/3 22:33
you already wrote here that you have found the school.
if so, you should ask them in details and follow their suggestions.
by ken (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 00:33
Thank you for trusting us enough to share a little more of your situation with us. The clarification will make it easier for people to explain what opportunities you have and offer suggestions as to whether or not those will help you achieve the results you're hoping for.

You may not like what I have to say next, but please understand that I'm not trying to say you're naive, or that you should give up entirely on your goal of studying/living in Japan. However, before searching for someone to serve as your legal guardian in Japan, you might benefit from first discussing your goals with an educational counsellor and psychologist to determine the path that will be most likely to make you happy in the long term.

You mention being unhappy with the educational system in New Zealand because it is not challenging enough for you. However, while the Japanese education system is more challenging than other countries' in many ways, there are also ways in which it is less challenging. In broad, simplified terms, Japanese high schools tend to have high standards for technical subjects, such as math and science. However, Japanese high schools are often decidedly less challenging than English-territory schools in things such as creative writing, debate/discussion, and critical thinking essays. Depending on the specific ways in which you find school in New Zealand to be insufficiently challenging, you might find a Japanese school to be even less so.

It's also worth bearing in mind that international schools in Japan aren't schools that teach the Japanese curriculum in English. Instead, they tend to teach a curriculum that's closer to what's taught in schools overseas, particularly the curriculums in English-speaking countries. Most of the students at international schools in Japan are students who are planning to attend university outside of Japan, and many of them are only living in Japan temporarily due to their parents' work. In other words, an international school in Japan may end up feeling very similar to a school in New Zealand, and may not provide the challenge and atmosphere you are hoping for.

You also mention having trauma and anxiety issues. If those are linked to your present environment, some distance from that environment could have a positive effect. However, while moving to a new country provides many exciting opportunities, it also always comes with some new potential sources of mental stress, and you may have a particularly hard time coping with them if you're already in an exhausted emotional state in your home country. Though Japan is a safe, clean, and generally polite and comfortable country, there are a number of cultural transitions for new arrivals, particularly those coming from English-speaking countries.

The language barrier can be particularly difficult, as even if you'll be attending an international school where the classes are taught in English, outside of school you'll be in an environment where very few people can communicate in any language other than Japanese. Even if you're an adventurous person who knows the basics of the language, this can be a source of stress. Like you, I had an interest in speaking Japanese from my teen years, and after some basic-level studies I was able to come to Japan. I generally enjoyed the challenges of communicating in Japanese, but when I got lost on my way to a very important appointment and tried asking someone for directions, only to completely fail at communicating, I didn't think of it as a fun learning experience, but as a painfully stressful situation. The same goes for a coworker of mine who came down with a bad case of diarrhea but had no clue what kind of medicine she needed to buy at the drug store, couldn't ask the clerk, and had to wait until the next day when an English-speaking friend could go with her.

I can understand not wanting to live in a dorm if you have anxiety issues. Living with a Japanese family, though, can also present new sources of stress. Since you are a minor, the family will feel responsible for you, but since you're not their child, they don't really have the authority to control your behavior. That imbalance can sometimes make the relationship awkward and uncomfortable, and it can get even more complicated if the family also has children of their own in the house. I spent a year as a student living with a Japanese family, and we got along very well, but even we had a few verbal disagreements, and I have friends who got along so badly with the families they were living it that they had to move out and search for another place to live.

Again, I apologize if it sounds like I'm trying to discourage you, and I completely understand the mindset of "I don't feel satisfied here, so I want to try living in another country." My concern, though, is that in your current state, moving to Japan and enrolling in an international school may or may not provide you with the environment that you're hoping for. Because of that, talking with an educational counsellor and psychologist will probably give you a clearer picture of whether now is the time for you to be moving to Japan for your studies, or whether you'd be better off postponing that until a later time.

One final note. You mention u I do not have time to spare to go on student exchange anymore.v However, there are many student exchange programs in which you can earn credits towards graduation at your home country school, especially at the university level. After discussing your situation with an academic counsellor, you may find that waiting until after graduating from high school and coming to Japan on a university exchange program, or perhaps attending a language school in Japan, is more likely to make you happy.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 02:08
Ifve already said, Ifve already looked at all the possible options. This is my only option, itfs this or nothing. I already plan to move to Japan after high school and go to university there but I canft do that if I havenft graduated high school. Itfs go to an international school in Japan or donft graduate high school. I know international schools in Japan donft teach the Japanese curriculum but many of them teach one that would be ok for me like IB and international schools tend to be more into making sure their students get really good grades and go to top universities. I know there will be many challenges if I go to Japan but Ifm just gonna have to find a way to overcome them. I actually went to Japan before, in 2019, only for two weeks though. I went on a student exchange with my city and stayed with a host family while I was there. I faced a lot of difficulties in that 2 weeks, things that would usually absolutely destroy me but somehow I managed to make it through it easily and overcame and struggles without too much hassle. Because of that experience I believe while things would be tough, I think I can overcome it and Ifll be able to handle it. I know I would face much harder challenges but I have reason to believe I would probably face them better then I would usually do at home. It is far from ideal, I donft really want to move to another country to attend school by myself but this is my only option. I canft go to school here. So I either need to find a way to overcome these problems or thatfs it, I donft finish high school. This isnft a matter of just going to Japan for fun which I can do later, this is a matter of me graduating high school.
by Rachelcookie rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 02:40
You wrote above:h In the matter of visa, I have found international schools which will sponsor students to come to Japan to finish their education so that is not a problem.h

I would suggest you reach out to those schools and ask them for THEIR advice on your guarantator question.

Frankly I am not sure if a school can really sponsor you a visa for studying at a high school if you are not there with your parents or on a student exchange. But I am no immigration expert. So as you say that you found schools that would sponsor the visa, I would start with them to learn what their requirements for the visa sponsoring is, what kind of accommodation they suggest and what their curriculum is. If those schools really sponsor visas for unaccompanied minors, they must have come across these questions already.
by LikeBike rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 02:49
I am looking for a guardian, not a guarantor. I think in the case of these schools, a member of school staff acts as a guardian for the student but most schools require you to have a guardian in the country. These schools also have dorms for international students to stay at. I only found a couple schools like this though and they are the more expensive ones.
by Rachelcookie rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 02:53
by LikeBike rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 07:28
Rachel - I am an international teacher who has taught at one of the best international schools in Japan for 3 years. Let me break down so hard facts.

There are 3 main educational systems for international schools in Japan. They are:

(1) The IB System - which requires students to undertake 2 FULL years of schooling. The IB is the main educational system for international schools in Japan

(2) The American System - I think this is 2 years also - but I don't know enough

(3) The UK system - which I don't know enough about

There is one dorm school that I am aware of - UWC Karuizawa.

The International educational system also follows a different schedule than NZ. It normally starts in August - not February.

Why are people talking about guardians and guarantors? Well - the Japanese legal system is quite different than many of our home countries. You are unable to rent without most of the time having a guarantor.

On not having a quardian - NZ, Australia, the US, Canada, Singapore and the UK have schools which brings overseas kids into learn a main language (normally English) and complete their schooling.

Japan does not and will not have such a plan for guardians for what you are looking for. Why? Well - what purpose does a government have to encourage English schooling for students from outside of Japan. It doesn't.

To put it simple - what you want to happen probably won't. I have spoken to people from many schools in Japan in the past and HAVE NEVER heard of a teacher acting as a guardian for a student.

For example - Japan has some tough drug laws. If you smoke Cannabis as a minor - then the work visa of the guardian could be cancelled. I'm not saying you'd do that - but being a guardian is more than a piece of paper - it is a serious legal requirement.

Is it possible for you to attend a boarding school? Yes.

Is it possible for you to find a guarantor and attend an international school? Probably not.
by mfedley rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 07:42
I just read the bottom few posts which I originally went past.

One thing to note is that international schools will teach exactly or very close to the same as NZ. How do I know this? I was helping a former student I taught in Taiwan when they were at school in NZ through re-reading their work and making suggestions to help them improve. That's when I was in Japan!!

You also mentioned that the work is too easy and you lose motivation. How is completing the same education in another country going to help that?

I've noticed that you've said that "completing school in Japan is your only option". Unfortunately - your only option is not possible.

I also wanted to say that living in another country is challenging - specifically when the country speaks another language. You mentioned that you speak some Japanese which is helpful - but we don't know much about your reading ability.

You also mentioned that you have suffered from trauma which I am sorry to hear. International schools to be honest (specifically the cheaper ones) will not have the expertise or resources support people who have experienced severe trauma. The IB is also what I see as more stressful than the 1st or 2nd year of uni (you also need to complete service and complete an independent research thesis) so that might not be for you.

Note that Japan can be quite rigid with how it does things - which is why I am worried that you will get an answer that you might not agree with. Being able to accept things that you don't like, agree or want is also a pivotal skill needed when living in another country.
by mfedley rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 12:47
Thanks again, Rachel, for the additional information on your background and goals.

uI already plan to move to Japan after high school and go to university there but I canft do that if I havenft graduated high school. . Itfs go to an international school in Japan or donft graduate high school. I know international schools in Japan donft teach the Japanese curriculum but many of them teach one that would be ok for me like IB and international schools tend to be more into making sure their students get really good grades and go to top universities.v

I understand that you feel like finishing high school at an international school in Japan is your only option, and that your goal is to then continue on to university in Japan. Unfortunately, those two things may not be congruent.

You are correct in that international schools often have higher academic standards than other schools, and are more focused on preparing their students to enroll in high-level universities. However, the primary purpose of international schools in Japan is to prepare their students to attend universities outside of Japan. The students are not simply non-Japanese people attending high school in Japan, but people attending high school in Japan who plan on leaving Japan for university. In a sense, you could say that "foreign-system high school" would be a more accurate description than "international high school."

So while attending an international school in Japan may prepare you for admission to a high-level university in the U.S. or U.K., it may not prepare you for admission to a high-level university in Japan. It may not even prepare you for admission to a low-level university in Japan. Because an international high school's curriculum is designed to be closer to that of an overseas school, they generally do not focus on specifically Japanese subjects. International schools in Japan generally do not put a major focus on teaching their students Japanese language, Japanese history (i.e. the history of Japan), Japanese literature, or Japanese social studies, because overseas universities aren't particularly concerned about those subjects. Those are, however, all subjects that even low-level Japanese universities will require you to be proficient in before you are admitted.

u I know there will be many challenges if I go to Japan but Ifm just gonna have to find a way to overcome them. I actually went to Japan before, in 2019, only for two weeks though. I went on a student exchange with my city and stayed with a host family while I was there. I faced a lot of difficulties in that 2 weeks, things that would usually absolutely destroy me but somehow I managed to make it through it easily and overcame and struggles without too much hassle.v

First, spending two weeks immersed in another culture is an impressive achievement, and definitely something worth being proud of. Please understand that I'm not trying to diminish or deny your experiences by what I say next.

There are many differences between what it feels like to spend two weeks living in a different country and an entire year. At the most basic level, unpleasant aspects are much easier to put up with or adapt to when you know, whether through actively telling yourself or just on a subconscious level, that it's only for a short time. But in a situation where you're going to be subjected to those unpleasant experiences for a longer time, psychologically they can start to feel very much like permanent negative aspects of your life.

That applies not only to your ability to adapt yourself to new surroundings, but also to how adaptable people will be to you. A host family/classmates/neighbors/Japanese friends may not agree with certain aspects of your behavior, but still be happy to accommodate them if you're only in Japan for a short time and the situation is only going to come up between you a few times. Stretch that out to a year, though, and you're much more likely to run into more severe culture clashes, because "Well, let's just agree to disagree" is harder to do for long-term situations.

Again, none of this is to say that it's wrong of you to want to come to Japan long-term, and I'm not saying that you will absolutely be unhappy if you do. However, there are challenging aspects to that plan, and there may be ways to make the situation easier for yourself than just "Ifm just gonna have to find a way to overcome them." That's why I recommend talking to an academic counsellor and psychologist. I'm assuming you'd be more comfortable discussing the more specific nature of why you're dissatisfied in New Zealand with them, and that information would allow them to in turn help you in developing strategies and plans to overcome those challenges before your departure.

Developing such strategies before departure is particularly important if you're hoping to come to Japan for high school, because as a minor you'll have little, if any, power to change your living situation after you arrive. If after arriving you come to the conclusion that your school isn't providing you with the education and atmosphere you need, you won't be able to decide for yourself to change schools. If you don't like the family you're living with, you won't be able to decide for yourself to move out and go live somewhere else in Japan.

uThis isnft a matter of just going to Japan for fun which I can do later, this is a matter of me graduating high school.v

I understand that, and I understand that you feel that finishing high school in New Zealand is impossible for you. My concern is that attending an international high school in Japan may not make it any easier for you to graduate, and may possibly make it even more difficult.

My worry is not that trying to finish high school in Japan won't be fun for you, but that it may possibly make you unhappy, in both the short and long term. That's why I think speaking to an academic counsellor and psychologist, looking at specific international schools and places to live, would be helpful. I do think there are paths to studying/living in Japan that will make you happy, and I also think there are study/live in Japan programs that would make you unhappy. Rather than leave that to chance, a more specific discussion with someone with more details about your dissatisfaction in New Zealand and future goals will help you determine which schools and programs would be most likely to make you happy, and which aren't.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 14:38
International schools don't give you a diploma because they are not recognized as "schools" in Japan.
You need to take and pass wZƒxF莎 all in Japanese, which is challenging even for native Japanese kids.

Sorry to say this, but your plan sounds quite unrealistic.
by Tai (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: company that acts as a guardian for minors? 2022/5/4 15:29
it is true that you can't get a diploma of high school graduation, approved by Japanese government. but, generally speaking, you will be qualified to apply an entrance emamination for universities, when you graduated high school program of international schools.
by ken (guest) rate this post as useful

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