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Different requesting methods 2009/9/2 23:03
Until now, I have encountered a few ways of asking/ordering someone to do something. So the next question which came to me was, which one is more polite and which one is least? These are the structures I’ve learned so far:

1. –te kudasai/ -te kudasaimasenka
2. –te moraimasu/ -te moraemasenka
3.–te itadakimasu / -te itadakimasenka
4. –te hoshii (desu)
5. –te kure/ -te kuremasenka

I have a fair understanding of what their literal meanings are. Kudasai is the honorific forn of kure, and likewise for moraimasu and itadakimasu. I’d just want to know how polite/rude I sound when I use them. Or if there are any other subtle differences that I might have missed. And I also wondered about something else. Can I add –tai to their ends? Eg: “-te itadakitai desu”, “-te moraitai desu”.

Any info is appreciated. Thank you.
by Zyzzyva (guest)  

... 2009/9/3 09:37
Of the expressions you've become famliar with so far, forms used for requesting are as follows. Please be careful with the forms in 2 and 3 particularly.

1. –te kudasai = Please (do this)

2. –te moraEmasu ka = Will you please (do this) for me
-te moraemasen ka = Won't you please (do this) for me

3.–te itadakEmasu ka = Would you kindly (do this) for me
-te itadakEmasen ka = Wouldn't you kindly (do this) for me

4. –te hoshii (desu) = I want you to (do this)

5. -te kuremasu ka = Will you kindly (do this)
-te kuremasen ka = Won't you kindly (do this)

Actually the one you listed under 1. is a more polite version of "kuremasu/kuremasen ka":
6. -te kudasaimasu ka = Would you kindly (do this)
-te kudasaimasen ka = Wouldn't you kindly (do this)

1. is the most basic one
4. is simply stating your wish (so not really a request)
2. and 5.are now getting to be a politer request as it is a question (and negative question is more roundabout, so that's politer)
3. and 6 are a politer version of 2 and 5
by AK rate this post as useful

A note on tekudasai 2009/9/3 17:37
-tekudasai is the most basic form, but you should be careful when using it because it is very often used to imply an order or an instruction.

For example your if you teacher tells you 次のページを見てください。(See the next page)it's an instruction rather than a request.

Also it is not so common to use -tekudasai when requesting things from people higher in status than yours; it might come off as too direct. So if you want your teacher, for example, to open the door for you, you should use -temoraemasenka/-teitadakemasenka rather than -tekudasai.

Also a minor correction but the plain form counterpart of tekuremasuka is tekureruka not tekure.

Kure is the imperative form of kureru, and in tekure from is generally used by males and it's rather informal in tone. Women don't generally use tekure or imperative form for that matter.

Good luck studying! :)

by koneko-chan (guest) rate this post as useful

umm... 2009/9/3 22:58
Thanks.

What I meant was that "-te moraimasu" and "-te itadakimasu" are use as they are (ie not as questions).

This is the example I encountered in my textbook:

"Kono ato de, watashi no yatta toori ni kumitatete moraimasu kara, yoku mite ite kudasai."

So can I use something like eg: "Narabete itadakimasu." ?

Thanks again. ^^
by Zyzzyva (guest) rate this post as useful

Ummm 2009/9/4 07:08
No, "...te moraimasu" and "...te itadakimasu" are instructions (obviously from an instructor, teacher, or from a superior, and not considered a polite request.

"Kono ato de, watashi no yatta toori ni kumitatete moraimasu kara, yoku mite ite kudasai."

This is a clear instruction, not a request. It's saying "After this, you will assemble (it) just as I did, so watch carefully." It sounds like an instructor in a class.

So can I use something like eg: "Narabete itadakimasu." ?

It will say "You will line them up" in the above instructor-like tone :)
by AK rate this post as useful

okayz 2009/9/4 18:00
Nicely explained Ak. Got it, thanks. =D
by Zyzzyva (guest) rate this post as useful

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