Dear visitor, if you know the answer to this question, please post it. Thank you!

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every man needs the water closet 2006/11/8 10:15
Bill, your former residence is definitely contributing to our local community!

Mycal is a gigantic enterprize that runs various shopping facilities fit for the average consumers. My family loves the Warner Mycal cinema complexes. Great popcorns.

It seems from the yohidevils site that Ave.D is now partially Route 16 and partially Honmoku Dori, and Ave A was the first part of Honmoku Dori.

Honmoku is also famous (well, at least famous among Yokohama citizens) for its Honmoku Jazz Festival. All the middle-aged Japanese men I happen to know who grew up in Honmoku do have a sort of an American jazzy or jazzy-bluesy feel. Booze-drinking bad boys, but very elegant.
by Uco rate this post as useful

jazz 2006/11/8 12:35
Sounds like a place where I'd be comfortable.

Uco; if you were to stand in the street of what used to be Avenue D and look toward the sea at the former Sannotani streetcar stop area, what would you see ?
Regards,

Eric
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

Honmoku party time 2006/11/8 18:25
Eric and Uco,
There must have been some party time ''opportunities'' when I was there. My 5th grade teacher would often come to class, give us an assignment, tell us to keep quiet, and then put her head on her desk. We thought she must have partied too much the night before. The Zebra Club name seems to be familiar to me for some reason. I remember only going to the Officers Club at the Golden Dragon to enjoy a good buffet with all those ice sculptures.
My mother was a party animal and would often have people over to our house to play Bridge or Canasta...I would be the bartender and fix their drinks for a small fee. Gosh! I don't remember the phrase ''contributing to the delinquency of a minor'' in those days. Our home was also a gathering place during typhoons, because our house was on a protected terrace with walls on three sides; actually we in a hole, that was opened on one side. The wind would really blow hard and the rain would be drench the home so badly, the walls would seap water. We used towels under the outside doors and windows to keep the water from blowing in. I always wondered how the Japanese endured those big blows in their little houses.
I made some good spending money fixing drinks for all my parents' friends who were hunkered down at our home.
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

booze 2006/11/9 02:24
Bill:
Neither of my folks drank alcohol but we had a stock of liquor and beer for guests who did. A friend of dad's who worked the National Security Administration (NSA?... No Such Agency, he would say) would come by and have two beers and promptly fall asleep in the lazyboy chair.
I remember a party held for Colonel Somebody who was rotating back stateside. His wife discovered the cabinet where liquor was stored and promptly drained a bottle of vodka. She konked out on the kitchen floor and had to be carried to the car. I thought she was dead.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

Re: Booze 2006/11/9 03:23
Eric,
I'm a teetotaler...I guess after seeing what drinking alcohol does to people for many years, I thought it best to steer clear of the stuff. I eat about everything in sight though. As a result, I haven't seen my feet in years, especially now that I am a senior citizen. My "chest" seems to have fallen into my "drawers".
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

Rick and Eric 2006/11/9 08:46
I wonder if Rick is still viewing this. I found some photos of the current area discribed as "walking from Kominato crossing towards the sea".
http://www.nikikitchen.com/honmoku_umi.html

Also on the following link, feel free to click on the right hand list linked with the left hand map for more photos.
http://www.nikikitchen.com/honmaki_tour.html

This site seems to be run by an English language cooking class taught by foreign wives from various countries.

I found this site while a quick search for Ricksha Room, a pub once reknowned in the 50s and was very recently closed down. I read on an article that icons from the Japanese entertainment business used to hang out at the Ricksha Room for its genuine American cuisine and privacy from the Japanese fans and media.

As you can see in the photos, the area is still pretty much 50s-ish American, and that is the image that most people in the Kanto Plain have of the town of Honmoku.

Eric, I've never been to Sannotani, but if I were to stand in the street of what used to be Avenue D and look toward the sea at the former Sannotani streetcar stop area, I would probably see small buildings and then an industrial bay area. The area can easily be spotted on Google Earth and that is what I see from a bird-eye view. I'll try to take a better look if I ever go there myself. I did find info that the public bus that usually stops at Sannotani stop (actually it is officially read Sannoya) will run a different route when the Hiei shrine holds a festival.
by Uco rate this post as useful

tnx 2006/11/9 10:23
Uco:
Thanks for your observations. I have seen two or three views of the area based on satellite maps but really cannot define what these buildings are.
A friend suggested a trip to Japan would be best in late March/Early April. This is cherry blossom time, right ?
I'll likely go Northwest.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

Environmental issues 2006/11/17 23:08
Uco:
This week I met with representatives of a Japanese trading company regarding a project to sell some of our product into Japan. You weren't kidding when you mentioned how sensitive Japan has become about the environment. We may have to take product to Korea and break bulk, then bring smaller quantities to Japanese ports because of draft restrictions. Japanese authorities doesn't want to risk groundings or spills in their waters and the businesses don't want their name in the newspapers. The additional costs will be significant.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

... 2006/11/18 15:02
Eric, not Sannotani but I happened to pass Sannodai by bus the other day, and it was a nice hilly, curvy road with lots of cozy-looking apartments along the road.

The environment is precious both for Japan as well as for our planet :)
by Uco rate this post as useful

Cherry Blossom bloom time 2006/11/20 06:05
Eric and Uco,
I've been told that the Cherry Blossoms in Yokohama start to bloom around March 24 and have reached their peak by the first week in April. Uco, please confirm.
Thank you.
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

sakura 2006/11/20 18:23
That sounds right, Bill. There's a lot of climate/weather related threads in the "Travel" section of this Question Forum.
by Uco rate this post as useful

Eric's old neighborhood? 2006/11/29 07:21
Eric,
The picture(s) at this link http://www.yohidevils.net/yearbook/46thru71/bettyr05.htm
are of the old neighborhood circa the beginning 1946-47. Can you see Ave D. and where you lived?
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

Ave D 2006/11/30 01:32
In the second photo, it looks as if Avenue D is an unpaved road, altho there seems to be a streetcar in the middle of the street. I recall looking at these pix a while back and thinking about how new Area 2 looked. Some of the 4 plexes had tile roofs...
You can clearly see the Bluff in the middle of Area 2. The hillside was covered with bamboo and there was a small cave where us kids liked to play. This cave and a couple of others on the other side of Avenue D had been dug as air raid shelters during the war. Just beyond the Area 2 end gate and fire station was a very large cave that was home to a Japanese family. The entry was boarded up but a small smokestack, a door and a single window indicated it was occupied. Things were still very tough for a lot of poor Japanese in the 50s.
I remember hearing that some kid got hurt in one of these caves in Area 2 and this brought about an investigation by MPs and later, cement trucks arrived and filled them in.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

The old neighborhood along Ave D 2006/11/30 02:16
Eric,
The pictures are indeed on the Yohidevils web page and were provided by Betty Reichard Austin, whose father was responsible for building all the dependent housing. I found the pictures at:
http://www.yohidevils.net/
Click on Table of Contents
Click on Classes 46 - 71
Click on School Year 1946-1947
Click on Early Yokohama
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

photos 2006/11/30 04:32
Doggone it, Bill, I squandered my entire lunch hour on the YOHI web site. I noticed that they had removed the pictures of the MSTS ships, which is a pity. We made 6 crossings on the Darby, both Patricks, the Mann and one other ship I can't remember.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

Ships 2006/11/30 04:39
Eric,
We came to Yokohoma from San Francisco by way of the Sultan and retuned to Seattle by way of the Randall, I think. On the return trip, I had to share a room with two other guys my age. I don't even remember their names now. Sad.
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

Randall 2006/11/30 05:33
We made a crossing on the Randall and I think we crossed on one of the Patricks twice. Each sailing was out of and back into Seattle, except for the last trip home, on the Gen. Mann, which sailed into Oakland, California. My dad was with us on this last trip and we made a one day stop in Honolulu which was fun.
When I tell my friends about being at sea for 14 or 15 days, they can hardly believe it. The first crossing was in 1951 and I was three years old. I had just had about 10 shots in my butt and both arms as preparation for my Asian adventure and I got seasick about an hour out of Puget Sound. The crossing was awful with big swells. I was sure we were going to die.
We sailed into Yokohama and my dad was waiting for us on the pier. Our first residence was in Sagamihara. Dad worked at Camp Zama at the time. He moved from inspections to purchasing at the Army's Japan Procurement Agency and we moved to Yokohama in about 1955.
by Eric Davis rate this post as useful

Sultan 2006/11/30 06:43
Eric,
There was a merry-go-round on top deck of the ship and I use to ride it after lunch and supper. Everyone else was sick most of the time due to the ship rolling left and right. A couple of days the Pacific was like a lake...very calm. Amazing.
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

Yohidevils webmasters retiring 2006/11/30 06:46
Eric,
Did you notice that the Yohidevils webmasters, Jim and Iva Hyatt are retiring after ten years? They have found someone who will take over the web site, otherwise it would have to be abandoned. Read about it on the Home page, below the Table of Contents link
by Bill N. rate this post as useful

jim and Iva 2006/11/30 09:54
I had heard they were getting along in years and didn't want to continue managing the site. Years ago, I sent Jim a couple of my YOHI annuals that are scanned into the site. My mom was on the school board and is pictured in one of the pages. Mom still lives in Iowa. Her 86th birthday was November 13th. Dad passed in 1966. He was an old timer, born in 1906. He was actually too old for WW II duty but volunteered anyway, as a civilian pilot in the China-Burma-India Campaign. He was a "Hump" pilot.
by Eric rate this post as useful

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