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Wally in the Ozarks 2009/9/28 09:27
Drop me a note at ericdav@sbcglobal.net.

There's too much to tell for this board.
by Eric (guest) rate this post as useful

Rots of Pictures and Other Comments 2009/9/28 12:19
This is the translated site where I found the Milk Plant pictures. Where the translated links don't work you may be able get the picture by finding the corresponding link on the original Japanese site. I don't know what most of these pictures are but some of them may bring back memories to some of you.
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ja&u=http://www.kindaik...
http://www.kindaikenchiku.com/main_menu.htm
Peter-san: What is your old street address? I may be able to map where it was. I've been meaning to tell you that I don't know if it's the same woman but there was an old German woman who owned a German restaurant in Chinatown that lived about a block from us on a street (Jizo-zaka) that had European houses that had survived the war. My parents knew her and we visited her house at least once but I don't know the name of her restaurant and I don't remember ever eating there. I was impressed that she had lived in Yokohama through the war and before. The houses on that street all look Japanese now on Google Street View so I guess the old houses are gone.
Anybody remember restaurants? The one restaurant I do remember in Chinatown from 1953 was Original Joe's. It's still operating but in a different location. When I went out to eat with my parents we usually ate at one of the military clubs, the Golden Dragon or the Spike Club, not very adventurous. There was also a DAC Club that we went to with civilian friends that worked for the Army but I don't remember the name. I do remember eating once at the Gajoen, a fancy old Japanese restaurant that is still there. When I ate with my friends we'd eat Japanese food because it was cheaper and better than eating military snack bar food. The little restaurants had fake rice and noodle dishes in the window with prices, usually around fifty Yen. I think a hamburger at the PX was about 15 Cents but not very tasty. I don't remember a cafeteria at our school. When I returned to Japan in 1964 the only thing I would go to a military club for was to cash a check and exchange MPC for Yen. The places I went to usually had Japanese names I couldn't read. I do remember going to a place in Chinatown that advertised ''real American Pizza'' but it didn't compare to NY or NJ pizza and I never went back. When I couldn't get to Yokohama from Atsugi I used to hang out at the Bar Brother in Yamato and eat at the nameless Japanese place next door or go to Granny's Steak House across from the railroad tracks where they fixed the best Teriyaki Steak I've ever eaten in my life.
Barbara-san: Arigato for posting James Lamont's article. It brought back a lot of memories of similar experiences I had while living in Yokohama as a kid and explained a lot. The friendliness of the Japanese people and the safety for a young kid roaming around Yokohama and the many treasure's of Motomachi which was a short walk from where we lived and apparently not far from where young Jamie-san lived. I was always Dabe-san to the Japanese because they pronounced the v in David as b.
Dave-san
by Dave Horne (guest) rate this post as useful

Dave-san 2009/9/28 13:50
Believe it or not I never knew the name or address of the apartment in question, near chinatown. Was there only 4 months.
My other address was 187 Manzaka Honmoku, Naka-ku Yokohama. but I got mail thru the APO SF 96503
The lady at the Bettys Kitchen moved to Yokohama on the day of the great Kanto earthquake 1 sept 1923 I believe. I have a photo I will try and postit when I can.
Looks like Wally is looking to move up in the world, maybe Eric can rent him a room.
Be sure they have good recycling .. especially for glass bottles. Or perhaps Missouri has a bottle deposit program, that will pay the rent.
by Peter (guest) rate this post as useful

Maeta bashi bridge 2009/9/28 17:06
Peter,
The bridge that you describe crossing to go to the 100 steps would have been Maeta Bashi. It is still there. It goes from the Moto Machi China Town entrance to Moto Machi. You can cross it on Google street view. Currently on that corner in Moto Machi there is a Kikuya Confectionary Shop and a Charmy Takaka Jewelry Store. Either or both may have been there when you were here. There is also a Godiva Chocolates. There used to be a place on the other corner that sold Japanese prints. It was likely there when you lived here. I can't recall the name of it now.

If you walk the street with Google, you may also be able to see a crane that was used to lift things off the boats to take to warehouses that used to line the river. It is just to the east of the riverside street and the bridge intersection.

As for the German restaurant you mentioned, I have never heard of nor been to it. There is however an old German restaurant in Kannai or Yamashita cho that might have been preceded by the one you mention. It was already old when I came here 22 years ago. I do know a German family that has a German restaurant in Kamakura and they have been here since before the war.

I don't know if the family I know ever lived on Jizozaka or not.

Dave, when you were here, were there trees on Jizozaka? I previously lived on Jizozaka. It was a booger to climb on a hot humid summer day with no shade to protect you as you went.
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Smells of Yokohama... 2009/9/28 17:12
Some where in this thread, I saw someone mentioning the smells of Japan. Well here's one for you.

It is officially autumn now and there is one smell that it is impossible to avoid... The ghinkgo (sp?) nuts are falling and getting turned in to a smelly yellow orange paste on the streets.

If you know the smell, I apologize for bringing back that memory... but, I just had to do it. :)
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Bridge 2009/9/28 22:48
Japan Ginger
So ok the bridge is still there. If you cross the bridge from Motomachi to Chinatown side my apartment would have been about 150 feet to the west as one might envision from the photo.
Just curious, You have been in Japan for 22 years , this was fater being a food inspector? What caused you to stay and what are you doing now ?
by Peter (guest) rate this post as useful

Ginkgo 2009/9/28 22:55
We had a young ginkgo tree in our yard at Sannotani. These were very rare in Japanese cities but could be found in the countryside occasionally. It was a curiosity to Westerners but was appreciated by the Japanese for its scarcity.
My dad asked the Japanese lady who owned our house about it and was told it had been a birthday gift from her American officer boyfriend in about 1950. The boyfriend had built the house for her during the occupation period. She moved to smaller digs and rented it as a source of income when his tour was up.
My mom has a ginkgo treet in her yard in Iowa as a reminder of our time in Japan.
I think the Sannotani house is gone now but there is probably a pretty good love story still to be told.
by Eric (guest) rate this post as useful

on the case 2009/9/29 00:51
Peter, I'm still on the case of the missing house. ;) I visited my real estate agent today. I'm still puzzled by the big building in your photo and think that it is the most likely place to be remembered as it probably lasted longer here than the others. We looked at an old map. It indicated that the government building (insurance building) that I mentioned that was torn down in recent years was four stories high. The building in the photo appears to me to have been 5 stories.

The real estate lady is not old enough to remember the area from when you were here. Of course, she knows people that are including the Motomachin head man. I know a couple elderly people as well. I also know the people that own a fair amount of property on the corner of the street you lived on and the main drag going to the tunnels to Honmoku. I may give them a call. I know the property has been in the family for years but I don't know if they actually lived in the area in their youth.

by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

personal details on the net... 2009/9/29 01:05
Peter, I will soon have been here 23 years. About the first fived of that was as a food inspector. I can't really explain why but it just became home. In the early years, I always thought of my being here as being "just a few years." But those few years stretched in to the next few, in to the next few and so on. I no longer think like that. Somewhere along the line I got over it. :) This is where I live and where I do what I do. It is "home" to me every bit as much as any where I ever lived stateside ever was.

I understand your curiosity about what I do and so on but, I make it a rule to not post information about myself on the internet.
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Ginger 2009/9/29 01:32
Thanks for the research..
and I very much understand about your privacy.. I had often thought if I had stayed what I would have done and what my life would be like. That is the reason for my question.
Bettys Kitchen was around the corner and into Chinatown about two blocks from where I lived, what a remarkable person.
by Peter (guest) rate this post as useful

Pronunciation & Isezakicho places 2009/9/29 01:32
I have another little story for you about how the Japanese sometimes have trouble pronouncing American words - especially names. Well......with an ''l'' and an ''r'' in my name, that was usually a difficult one for them to pronounce. It came out more like Rori with the ''r's'' pronounced like a ''rolled soft ''d''''. I loved those people dearly anyway!

JapanGinger: I have a question: Is the clock which showed laborers moving/doing their job still in Isezaki-cho? When I lived Yokohama in the early '80's, there was a clock in the middle of the street which, when it chimed (every quarter hour, I believe), the sculpture/statuary inside the glass box or case, of laborers would move. I remember it being approximately 6 feet tall overall. I ''walked through'' Isezaki-cho on Google Earth Streetview a couple of months ago and couldn't find the clock. Also in Isezaki-cho there was a shop ''Washington Camera'' and a Chinese Restaurant (I appreciated their English menu even though we could point at what we wanted at the display window outside!) which I don't know the name of. These two businesses were on the left side of the street if you were walking toward the bay. On the right side of the street was an upscale bar, Henry Africa's. I believe they were a ''chain'' business, such as McDonald's or Pizza Hut. Am wondering if those places are still there.

I also have been wondering what the City of Yokohama (government office) has in its archive or historical records about the different places the Americans had possession of during the Occupation - if they have a ''special collection'' such as a museum would have. Or if they just kind of ''sweep it under the rug''. A Japanese friend showed me some locations where there had been American facilities (most specifically the Chapel) over the years. When I moved to Yokohama in 1980, the Chapel was at Bayside Courts, where there had previously been a Chief's (E-6) Club. It was built into the hill and had also been a bomb shelter - probably still was as there were still emergency supplies and rations and the yellow and black ''CD'' signs. During the time we were there, the American Military ''Community Support Facilities'' were being built in and adjacent to the Negishi Heights Housing Area. So, the Chapel moved from Bayview Courts to Negishi Heights and the name was changed from Hillside Chapel to Chapel of the Rising Sun. As a side note the Chapel on base at Yokosuka is Hope Chapel; I don't recall the name of the Chapel at NAF Atusgi as I never attended church services there. I suppose I could find the name if I explored the website for NAF Atsugi.
by Lori (guest) rate this post as useful

chapel 2009/9/29 02:35
Well, from looking at the website for NAF Atsugi, it appears that the name of the chapel is NAF Atsugi Chapel.
by Lori (guest) rate this post as useful

Maybe no clock... 2009/9/29 02:36
Lori, I don't recall ever seeing the clock you describe or the camera shop though I think it is possible that it is. I don't think I have ever seen a Chinese restaurant in Isezaki-cho where you describe it.

I can have a look next time I'm in Isezaki-cho.

I have been to the Henry Africa's in Isezaki-cho. I think it is gone. The McDonald's in that part of Isezaki-cho has been gone for years. Matsuzakaya department store closed within the last year. Another big old building that seems to have been a department store has become an off track betting place. Too bad as they had really nice, clean, western style toilets. :=)



I also have been wondering what the City of Yokohama (government office) has in its archive or historical records about the different places the Americans had possession of during the Occupation - if they have a ''special collection'' such as a museum would have. Or if they just kind of ''sweep it under the rug''. A Japanese friend showed me some locations where there had been American facilities (most specifically the Chapel) over the years. When I moved to Yokohama in 1980, the Chapel was at Bayside Courts, where there had previously been a Chief's (E-6) Club. It was built into the hill and had also been a bomb shelter - probably still was as there were still emergency supplies and rations and the yellow and black ''CD'' signs. During the time we were there, the American Military ''Community Support Facilities'' were being built in and adjacent to the Negishi Heights Housing Area. So, the Chapel moved from Bayview Courts to Negishi Heights and the name was changed from Hillside Chapel to Chapel of the Rising Sun. As a side note the Chapel on base at Yokosuka is Hope Chapel; I don't recall the name of the Chapel at NAF Atusgi as I never attended church services there. I suppose I could find the name if I explored the website for NAF Atsugi.

by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Did you know "Mr. Johnson?" 2009/9/29 02:44
Lori, do you remember an old gentleman named Mr. Johnson? He used to be really active in the VFW in Honmoku and was really a fixture up at Negishi (and probably elsewhere before Negishi). He had a some disablility with his leg, walked with a cane and a good bit of effort. He was always up at the club watching his soaps every afternoon and towards evening, he would often be hanging out at the snack bar outside the exchange...
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Dave -san 2009/9/29 10:53
The German woman you mentioned sounds very much like the one I recall. Would you recognize her if I were able to post a picture ? Also I have been all over the link you provided, very interesting. Do you give classes ? Sign me up!
Ginger-san when was Bayside Courts demolished or discontinued? I would guess it was on your "watch".
by Peter (guest) rate this post as useful

JapanGinger 2009/9/29 13:45
Thanks for your reply. I don't recall a McDonalds in Isezakicho; there was one on the corner at Motomachi (I have a picture of it). I also have a picture of a huge red chair taken outside of the Ethan Allen furniture store in Motomachi. There was a Dunkin' Donuts in Isezakicho and a friend and I were interested to see another familiar American "fast-food chain"; only to find out that Dunkin' Donuts is BRITISH!! Donuts were good, though. We did enough walking and sightseeing to wear off all those extra calories! A department store that was at Isezakicho (close to a Bus #103 bus stop) on the corner of what I remember as the main drag, was Odeon. I bought quilted fabric there to make baby quilts for a couple of friends when they had their babies. The second time we were stationed in Japan, I went in to buy fabric for another baby quilt........for my son this time! I was pregnant with him over there, but returned to the States before he was born. Odeon was also the name of a theater, but I can't remember whether the theater and the department store were in the same building.

The first time I lived in Yokohama (early '80's), a big hotel was being built on the "bay end" of Motomachi. Can't recall which one but it was an American Hotel Company with hotels pretty much all over the world. Do you know which one I'm talking about? Did you live in Yokohama in the early '80's?


In reply to your enquiry, I don't recall a "Mr. Johnson". We didn't have any affiliation with the VFW, nor do I recall such a gentleman at the Negishi facilities -- but then memories do fade!

I am really enjoying this conversation, Ginger. Domo arigato gozaimasu!
by Lori (guest) rate this post as useful

Isezaki and More 2009/9/29 15:21
Lori-san: Is this the clock?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/79958256@N00/1607704464
http://picasaweb.google.com/cabbit05/Japan142#5261750413549476098
More Peanut Club pictures to go with the march box pictures you previously posted. I probably threw a few of these match boxes away.
http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=peanut%20club%20yokohama&w=all&s=int&r...
Peter-san & Japan Ginger-san: Milk plant on 1956 map. QM Milk Plant: Follow the road from North Pier to the RR tracks, make a right turn on the tracks and you should see it. http://yohidevils.net/kanto/1956yoko/56y27.gif
It took up a lot more space than the park on the Google map.
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=100037329813345983921...
Peter-san: Bayside Courts was returned in 1983.
https://www.cnic.navy.mil/Yokosuka/CommunitySupport/Negishi/NegishiHis...
Question - Where was Bayside Courts? That's after my time but I'm guessing the Army had a different name.
Japan Ginger-san: I don't know if I ever followed Jizo-zaka all the way down to the bottom of the hill but I'm sure there were some trees. It's been fifty-five years since I lived there but I remember that I could see the European houses below the road that lead to our quarters, 8-599. Barbara-san lived at 8-506 during the same time and we rode the same school bus. When I went to Motomachi I walked down Omarudani-zaka which was right below where I lived. http://yohidevils.net/kanto/1956yoko/56yoko06.gif
The Bluff #18 house has been moved to the location where our house was. There is a tennis court where Barbara-san's house was.
http://www.city.yokohama.lg.jp/naka/english/wardoffice/englishpublicat...
It's interesting seeing how much of the former US military area has been turned into parks and recreation areas.
Dave-san
by Dave Horne (guest) rate this post as useful

Lori, this might amuse you 2009/9/29 21:21
The McDonald's that you mentioned that stood on the corner of Motomachi crossing is now a diamond engagement ring store.
Some New York outfit. I don't know how they make it. I never see anyone go in or come out of the place and they have three floors (I think).

It was one of McD's original shops in Japan and everyone was stunned. I was across the street when a big ladder truck pulled up and before morning everything that identified the place as a McDonald's was gone. It seems it took a few more days to gut the entire place.

That said, I don't know how they selected that location for their shop. I can't imagine a woman talking with her friends about going ring shopping... I always imagine them asking where her fiance bought the ring and when she says the name of the store nobody knows it.

In the end, she has to tell them "It is the store where McDonald's used to be.

Maybe I'm not the only one that has that image... and that's why they don't seem very busy.
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

A big hotel on the bay end of Motomachi? 2009/9/29 21:30
Lori, I have been in this area since early 1987. I have never known of a foreign hotel to have been located where you mention. The hotel that was at the bay end of Moto Machi was ''The Bund.'' I don't know if it was ever renewed and renamed for some period of time or not.
by JapanGinger rate this post as useful

Pictures 2009/9/30 00:32
The milk plant location you gave was exactly in the place I remembered..good for you !
Bayside Courts was about halfway between the Navy Exchange and Yamashita park on Ave A near the "coast".
Also the pictures show the matchbox but not the Peanut Club itself. I believe there is a photo of it out there but not sure how to find it.. perhaps Wally can help.
by Dave -san (guest) rate this post as useful

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