Sign in for a personalized experience.
Japan Guide Homepage
Travel
Living
Forum
Restaurants
Shopping
Jobs
Friends
Question Forum
-
Classifieds
-
Friends
-
Language Exchange
-
Tutors
-
Schools
-
Member Area

Japan Airlines  SAKITOKU

Home - Question Forum
Does Japan have a national animal?

ask a new question  -  post a reaction

Dear visitor, if you know the answer to this question,
please post it. Thank you!

Note that this thread has not been updated in a long time, and its content might not be up-to-date anymore.

Does Japan have a national animal? 2005/3/2 01:58
Does Japan have a national animal?
by Karen  

no animal but bird 2005/3/3 11:07
I can not find any info on a National animal but Japan does have a natinal bird.The following is a quote from a book I have
" The pheasent is now regarded as the national bird of Japan. It originally was designated as such in 1947 at the 81st Meeting of the National Bird Society of Japan"
" The Japanese pheasant,or kiji,was most likely selected because this green pheasant in unique to Japan,and futhermore because it appears in Japanese folk tales and so has becomean integral part of the Japanese cultural landscape"
I know its not quite what you were looking for but I hope it helps
"
by REDRUM36 rate this post as useful

Thanks for the info on Japan's bird! 2005/3/3 22:14
It was a big help and was just what I was looking for.
by Karen rate this post as useful

National Animal 2006/10/16 22:51
What is Japan's National Animal?
by Melissa rate this post as useful

National animal, bird and flower 2006/10/16 23:25
There is no official national flower, animal or bird. Some people say the unofficial national flower of Japan is the chrysanthemum, which has long been a symbol of Japanese emperors. However, most say that the sakura (cherry blossom) is the national flower because so many Japanese love to watch and celebrate these flowers in the spring cherry-blossom season. There are also several candidates for Japan's unofficial national bird. The crested ibis and the crane are very popular birds in Japan and often appear in Japanese art. However, most people say the national bird is the kiji (green pheasant).
by Kappa rate this post as useful

Panda 2006/11/7 07:25
Is the highly celebrated Giant Panda not considered a national animal, even though the Giant Panda origniates from China?
by Brittany rate this post as useful

... 2006/11/7 10:08
Is the highly celebrated Giant Panda not considered a national animal, even though the Giant Panda origniates from China?

No, certainly not!

by Uji rate this post as useful

. 2006/11/7 11:56
Nope!
The Giant Panda is not even indigonious to Japan.
by .. rate this post as useful

national animals 2007/2/9 13:37
Actually, Japan has quite a few animals of national importance. The crane, a symbol of purity and longevity, is (according to some legends) said to have brought the first ear of rice to Japan. The tortoise is an even more significant symbol of longevity, as there is a saying that "a crane lives for 1000 years, a tortoise 10,000". As such, cranes and tortoises are often depicted on furoshiki (wrapping cloths) given on weddings and other auspicious occasions. Of course, I think everyone knows about the famous Japanese carp, called 'koi'. These stand for masculinity, valor, endurance and tenacity and paper carps attatched to poles are used as a decoration on Boys Day (whishing for the sons to become as strong and brave as carp). A little less known are the 'tanuki' (sort of racoon dog) and 'kitsune' (fox). Both appear in numerous legends and are able to change their appearance. The kitsune are also protectors of shrines for Inari, a Shinto god closely connected with foxes. And finally, the horse was traditionally a sacred creature too, only meant for very important leaders and heroes. For example; commoners were not allowed to ride white or dappled horses, because those were considered to be servants of the gods. However, horses are also thought of as rather stupid, as shown by the fact that the written word for idiot (baka) consists partly of the character for horse. Well, I hope this info will be useful. It was a pleasure writing it, for those who have taken the time to read it.
by Steven rate this post as useful

dog 2007/2/10 21:57
I don't think Japan has a national animal, but there are a few species unique for Japan, like the Shibaken dog, snow-monkeys and the 3-colored wild cat.
by Johnie rate this post as useful

... 2007/12/5 05:59
There is no official national animal. The closest would probably be the Kiji which is what most would consider the (unofficial) national bird.
by yllwsmrf rate this post as useful

no it do 2008/4/7 10:22
no japan does not have a national animal however many people consider the japanese pheasant to be the nationa l animal so no but the national plant is also unnoficial but it is the sakura or cherry blossom
by chris rate this post as useful

reply to this thread

Advertisement

Online Reservations
Hotel
 
Car
 
Flight
 
Bus

(check-in)

Related Pages

Travel
Living
Japan A-Z
Community
Sightseeing
Accommodation
Transportation
Shopping
Essentials
Regions
Prefectures
Cities
Working
Studying
Living Cost
Apartments
Arts and Crafts
Entertainment
History
Religion
Etiquette
Food
Language
Tradition
Question Forum
Classifieds
Trip Reports
Member Area
Sightseeing Guide
Hokkaido
Sapporo
Otaru
Hakodate
Noboribetsu
Niseko
Furano
Daisetsuzan
Shiretoko
more...
Tohoku
Sendai
Matsushima
Hiraizumi
Hachimantai
Hirosaki
Lake Towada
Dewa Sanzan
Aizu
more...
Kanto
Tokyo
Yokohama
Kamakura
Hakone
Nikko
Kawagoe
Kusatsu
Narita
more...
Chubu
Nagoya
Mount Fuji
Izu Peninsula
Matsumoto
Kiso Valley
Takayama
Shirakawa-go
Kanazawa
more...
Kansai
Kyoto
Osaka
Nara
Kobe
Himeji
Mount Koya
Kumano
Ise Shima
more...
Chugoku
Hiroshima
Miyajima
Okayama
Kurashiki
Tottori
Matsue
Iwakuni
Hagi
more...
Shikoku
Takamatsu
Kotohira
Naoshima
Matsuyama
Kochi
Tokushima
Naruto
Iya Valley
more...
Kyushu
Fukuoka
Nagasaki
Kumamoto
Mount Aso
Beppu
Kagoshima
Kirishima
Yakushima
more...
Okinawa
Honto
Kume
Miyako
Yaeyama
Copyright © 1996-2014 japan-guide.com All rights reserved
home - site map - privacy policy - terms of use - contact - employment - Lɂ‚ - advertising