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''yo'' and ''ne''

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''yo'' and ''ne'' 2006/9/23 05:58
What is the difference between the gyoh in gkawaii desu yoh (itfs cute, isnft it?) and gyamete yoh (stop)?

Also, how is gneh generally used? Why is there both a gyoh and a gneh in gatsuiyoneh (itfs hot, isnft it?)

Also, my boyfriend often says gne?h to me after saying something, as if asking for confirmation of some sort. How am I supposed to respond to that?

Sorry if these are really basic questionsc Ifve never taken a Japanese class before, so therefs a lot I donft understand!

by christina  

Particles 2006/9/23 09:45
Christina,

The particles "yo" and "ne" are quite different in function, so I would strongly suggest that you look at a basic grammar explanation in print or on the web.

The page below explains the functions and meanings of the various particles, including "yo" and "ne".
http://www.timwerx.net/language/particles.htm

by Dave in Saitama rate this post as useful

thanks 2006/9/23 15:01
Thanks Dave, what a useful page!

So I guess the "yo" in "atsui yo ne" is to emphasize the hotness, and the "ne" is to check the agreement of the listener?

by christina rate this post as useful

... 2006/9/23 18:48
- So I guess the ''yo'' in ''atsui yo ne'' is to emphasize the hotness, and the ''ne'' is to check the agreement of the listener?

That's correct. Also, I would say that this is a ''yone'' rather than a ''yo+ne''. ''Yone'' is usually used to sort of emphasize and ask for agreement at the same time. The nuance is ''Boy! it's really hot, huh?'' or ''Needless to say, it's hot, right?''

-gkawaii desu yoh (itfs cute, isnft it?)

This is something that a lot of non-native speakers tend to misunderstand. ''Kawaii desu yo'' is an emphasis. So it's something along the lines of ''No! It's cute!'' or ''Look! It's really cute!'' as if someone had said something like, ''Nah, I don't think this is so cute.''

Or if you say ''kawaii desu yo'' to someone in a very gentle tone, it can mean ''You are indeed cute, my dear.'' Often used when someone shows up in a pretty dress without saying anything.

If you want to say ''It's cute, isnft it?'' you should say ''kawaii desu ne'' or ''kawaii desu yone''

''Yamete yohis like ''Hey! Stop!'' while ''Yamete ne'' is like ''Let's stop it, okay?'' and ''Yamete yone'' is like ''For goodness sake, stop, will you?''

- Also, my boyfriend often says gne?h to me after saying something, as if asking for confirmation of some sort. How am I supposed to respond to that?

Smile and nod, unless you're saying ''no'' :)

by Uco rate this post as useful

thanks 2006/9/23 22:26
Thanks for the clarification, Uco!

I'm a little confused about "kawaii desu yo" vs. "kawaii desu ne". My Japanese friend gave me a stuffed animal, and I said, "kawaii desu ne." She responded with "kawaii desu yo, kawaii desu yo", but I wasn't sure if she was 1) correcting me on my incorrect use of "kawaii desu ne", or 2) responding to my "kawaii desu ne." I should have asked her for clarification, but I was a little embarrassed at the time about my possible mistake. Later, I asked my Japanese boyfriend about it, and he said that "kawaii desu yo" should have come first and that "kawaii desu ne" is a response to it. I'm so confused!

Thanks again for the help :)

by christina rate this post as useful

Hmm 2006/9/23 23:26
At least I don't think the stuffed animal conversation was a correction of your statement.

Someone gives you a stuffed animal. You respond by saying, "Kawaii desu ne! (Oh, it's cute!)" This is normal.

But then, the sender usually says, "Kawaii desho? (It is indeed cute, isn't it?)"

Maybe the sender got a bit confused. People's language do get confused when they are talking in a mixture of Japanese and a foreign language.

Anyway, it sounds absolutely strange for the reciever to immediately respond with a "Kawaii desu yo."

by Uco rate this post as useful

my mistake? 2006/9/23 23:56
Ohhh, maybe she was saying "kawaii desho" and not "kawaii desu yo". What's the difference between "desho" and "desu yo"? (I didn't know there was a difference... I just thought that "desho" was a romaji shortening of "desu yo"!)

After being given the teddy bear, would it have been strange if I had said, "kawaii desu yo (or desho)"?

Also, what about the "yo" in "ii desu yo"? What kind of a "yo" is that? Is it used for emphasis? Is "ii desu yo" more formal or informal?

Sorry for all these questions!!!

by christina rate this post as useful

desho 2006/9/24 00:54
Desho is the polite formal of daro and it means "probably. Kawaii desho means "its probably cute" so it would be unusual to say so in response to receiving something...unless you haven't seen it!
It would be perfectly natural to say "kawaii desu yo" when receiving a gift. Then it would mean: "Wow! That's really cute." Here again, "yo" is used as an emphasis.
by Mar rate this post as useful

... 2006/9/24 02:50
"Desho" and "desu yo" is not at all the same thing.

"Desho" is used when asking for agreement, but it's a bit different from "ne".

For example, "kawaii desho" means more like "Look at me. Look at what I got. Look at what I got for you. Cute, isn't it?" while "kawaii (desu) ne" is more like "Look at you. Look at what you've got. Look at what you gave to me. It is indeed cute."

Hmm, now that I think of it, I think "desu yone" is more like asking for agreement, while "desu ne/da ne" is saying "indeed it is". Sorry, I can't analyse these things as good as AK probably can!

- After being given the teddy bear, would it have been strange if I had said, "kawaii desu yo (or desho)"?

If you say "kawaii desho" that would mean "Hey, everybody! Look at what I got. Cute, isn't it?"

- Also, what about the "yo" in "ii desu yo"? What kind of a "yo" is that? Is it used for emphasis? Is "ii desu yo" more formal or informal?

It depends on the context or tone of your voice, but if you're saying it plain, this "yo" is just something we put at the end of a phrase to soften the tone. For example, if you just say "ii (desu)" that would sound very straightforward but a bit distant. By saying "ii (desu) yo" you are sort of automatically adding a smile. But again, it all depends on the context.

I'm sorry, I can't agree with Mark's post, but that's just my opinion.

by Uco rate this post as useful

ah 2006/9/24 10:54
Thank you, I think things are slowly starting to make more sense!

I had always gotten mixed up between "ii", "iie", and "ii yo"... my boyfriend would ask me, "ii?" and I would always have problems remembering which meant "yes" and which meant "no." So "ii" and "ii yo" are the same thing, except that "ii yo" is a little lighter and less distant? And "iie" means "no"?

In my Japanese phrasebook, it says that "yes" is either "hai" or "ee." When is "ee" used?

-"desu ne/da ne" is saying "indeed it is"

How are "desu ne" and "da ne" different? Could I say "kawaii da ne"? Oh, and what about "kawaii ne"? Is "kawaii ne" more informal than "kawaii desu ne"?

Thank you!!! :)

by christina rate this post as useful

ii, iie, and ii yo 2006/9/24 11:00
Another question about "ii", "iie", and "ii yo"... I seem to remember my boyfriend saying that sometimes "ii" and "ii yo" are used to mean "no", or that "iie" is sometimes used to mean "yes", or something like that... I just seem to remember that he mentioned that sometimes they say the opposite of what they really mean... do you know anything about that?? That just got me even more confused about ii vs. iie vs. ii yo...

I appreciate the help!

by christina rate this post as useful

"iie" as "you're welcome" 2006/9/24 11:11
Another question... sorry!

My Japanese friend said that "iie" can be said in response to "arigato" as a more informal way of saying "you're welcome." With whom is it okay to use "iie"? I'm assuming that I can't say "iie" to teachers or anyone else in a position of higher authority... but what about a friend who is a few years older than I am? (I'm 24.) Or what if we're the same age, and we're acquainted, but I don't know the person very well?

Thank you... please take your time in answering! No pressure :)

by christina rate this post as useful

... 2006/9/24 11:54
- So "ii" and "ii yo" are the same thing, except that "ii yo" is a little lighter and less distant? And "iie" means "no"?

Generally speaking, that's correct.

- In my Japanese phrasebook, it says that "yes" is either "hai" or "ee." When is "ee" used?

"Ee" is slightly more informal than "hai".

On a related note, to be specific, "hai/ee" means "correct" and "iie" means "wrong". For example in English when someone says to you, "You don't like apples?" You say, "NO, I don't." But in Japanese you say, "HAI, suki dewa arimasen. (Correct, I don't like them.)" I suppose this answers your question on your other post.

- How are "desu ne" and "da ne" different?

"Desu" is a polite form of "da".

- Could I say "kawaii da ne"?

No, you can't because of other gramatical reasons that can be too confusing to discuss at the moment (We don't put "da" right after "kawaii").

- Oh, and what about "kawaii ne"? Is "kawaii ne" more informal than "kawaii desu ne"?

Correct.

- My Japanese friend said that "iie" can be said in response to "arigato" as a more informal way of saying "you're welcome."

I wouldn't say it's a more "informal" way. It's just a more "simple" way of saying "you're welcome". So it's okay to use it to teachers or anyone else in a position of higher authority. The nuance is "NO problem" or "DON'T mention it", I guess.

by Uco rate this post as useful

thanks 2006/9/24 13:01
Thank you Uco for your detailed and easy-to-understand explanations! Everything is much clearer now, and I will (hopefully!) remember everything you have taught me!

Thanks again! :)

by christina rate this post as useful

NE-YO 2007/4/29 21:05
does anyone have the idea what "ne-yo" means. "ne-yo" as one word. (: thanks!
by dan rate this post as useful

... 2007/4/29 23:06
Ne-Yo is just an R&B singer!!
by wacked rate this post as useful

Easy question~ 2007/5/21 03:05
Erm.. i don't really understand all these but.. could someone tell me what Kawaii-ne means?
by ashleyy rate this post as useful

Kawaii ne 2007/5/21 08:33
Ashleyy,

Erm.. i don't really understand all these but.. could someone tell me what Kawaii-ne means?

It's the same as "kawaii desu ne" explained extensively in this thread. It's just slightly more colloquial/feminine in tone.

by Dave in Saitama rate this post as useful

i think i get it now. ^-^; 2008/12/25 11:02
wow! this is so helpful! thank you so much everyone teehee ^-^;

i was quite confused about ''kawaii desu ne'' and ''kawaii desu yo''...

but i think that ''yo'' makes it more intensive? like it emphasises it more?

by Kaley rate this post as useful

Taro 2008/12/26 11:23
--in case of emphasis--
Taro has a pet which is very ugly. His friend, Ichiro asks Taro;
"kawaii desu ka?"(Do you think she is lovely?)
Taro possibly would respond
"kawaii desu yo!" (Yes, I do.)

--not emphasis--
Taro has a pet which is cute.
Ichiro says to Taro;
"kawaii desu ne." (she is really cute.)
Taro replies "kawaii desu yo."( yes, I think she is lovely.)

If Taro has his own baby, Ichiro will say;
"kawaii desu ne"(Your baby is really cute.)
Taro will say "Arigatou gozai masu."

by Wsd rate this post as useful

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