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What to do if earthquake outside?

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What to do if earthquake outside? 2012/3/25 23:20
I have read tips about what to do in case of an earthquake while in a house, but what to do outside?

Like walking Tokyo streets, should you run into any public building?

What if you are in the countryside? Someone has any idea where to take shelter in case it is not possible to reach a safe house?

by Go (guest)  

Re: What to do if earthquake outside? 2012/3/26 07:49
Keep calm and try to identify potential dangers as quickly as possible: falling glass or roof tiles, phone lines and poles, traffic. Try to avoid these dangers. Finding shelter under a stable roof could be a wise decision. Keeping distance from the edge of buildings could be wise, too, but don't just run into the street. Inside buildings, falling furnitures (including ceilings tiles) are the main dangers.

After a big earthquake, go to the nearest evacuation area. It is usually a park or something like that. Staying outdoors is usually a better idea than entering a house that could be damaged in an aftershock.

by Uji rate this post as useful

Re: What to do if earthquake outside? 2012/3/26 13:08
If you are outside, don't try to go inside a building. There may be falling window glasses, building sidings, roof tiles, neon signs/advertisement boards, etc. as you try to go in. Do go to any open space, i.e. a park, as fast as you can away from electrical wires, poles, and tall trees. Also away from elevated roads. They can fall down as it did in Kobe & San Francisco. Do run into the bamboo forest. Their roots are intertwined & the strongest. If in a train, a bus, or a car/taxi, stay inside. They will all stop and have a strong shell. When safe, get out. If you are near a house/building with garage or car park with long open span without supports on the street level, stay away as the building may buckle flat as happened on filled land in SF. Tokyo has many filled lands. The Tokyo Disneyland was closed for a while as the filled land acted like quick sand breaking concrete oozing out blackish water.
The weakest is real brick walls as they don't have any reinforcement. Not too many in Japan anymore but many in the east coast & mid west in the USA have so many buildings & chimneys made of bricks and they don't know the danger. They live under the false pretense as the earthquake is not frequent. But it is coming. Also, many mobile homes and houses are not tied down to the foundation. They will slip out by one jolt. Because of that they are identified as high risk areas.
by amazinga (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: What to do if earthquake outside? 2012/3/26 15:03
Outside in the countryside would be the best place to be in an earthquake- nothing is going to fall on you there so there is nothing to take shelter from!

In cities as above you need to watch out for falling glass, signs and wires but you are likely to be better off outside than inside where there are far more things that can fall on you.

Rather than looking for shelter in an earthquake I would head for the nearest wide open space- there can be very large aftershocks soon after a big earthquake, as we found out last March.

by Sira (guest) rate this post as useful

Listening to announcements 2012/3/26 16:00
Wherever you are, indoors or out, it's most important to seek information. For a lot of foreign stayers, there will be a language barrier. If there is, you may want to try to talk to others so that they will know you don't understand the announcements.

The best thing to do is to carry a portable radio or internet device. When out in the countryside, you will most likely hear annoucements from loud speakers.

These kind of information will usually tell you to, for example, stay off the shore to avoid tsunami or go to so-and-so kind of place. If you don't understand whatever is being repeated, ask someone so that they can lead you with gestures or drawings.

You can also avoid being alone in the middle of nowhere, because this increases the danger of being left alone from anyone looking out for your safety, be it about earthquakes, other natural disasters or crime.

Good preparation will free you from your worries so that you can have lots of fun!

by Uco rate this post as useful

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