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what is sake called with a snake in it

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Habu Sake from OkinawaMarket.com 2007/12/7 05:07
I purchased 2 bottles of Habu Sake from the okinawamarket.com i recieved them and they came pretty fast and with out trouble. They are expensive though
by Tori rate this post as useful

Habu Sake facts and history 2008/1/16 00:32
Habu Sake was originally created as a mild hallucinogen in china as the venom from the snakes slows the mind. After time, people found that only taking it occasionally in small doses could cause a mild aphrodisiac effect. They also found that by drinking a small quantity daily (about a thimble to a shot glass a day), would increase the persons energy and make their body healthier (this is due to the fact that their body builds a tolerance to the poison, which in turn increases their immune system).
A little later in history, the Japanese also adopted it and started making their own recopies of it.
Many bars that carry Habu Sake water it down to make it last longer. This eliminates the effects of the hallucinogens, but with the remaining poison in it, it temporarily shuts down the liver. This is why so many people believe it to be so potent in the first place. In truth, it is a very mild alcohol, but since it puts the liver on hold, any alcohol you consume after wards just sits at the liver waiting. So simply put, after the liver wakes back up, all the alcohol that was consumed floods the liver all at once which makes you very intoxicated very fast.
I hope this info is helpful.
by Neko rate this post as useful

ordering huba 2008/1/29 06:46
i also purchased a bottle of Habu Sake from the okinawamarket.com i recieved them and they came pretty fast and with out trouble. They are expensive though, i paid like 150 for it
by prince rate this post as useful

Habu Sake gets you ripped 2008/4/4 17:58
I just got back from a trip to Okinawa and brought both a bottle with a habu snake and a bottle without the snake but a sure thing to get into the states. Personally I saw both the bottles go throught the x ray scanner and I didnt see the snake. Anyhow, I got a bottle the first day there and we finished it that night after egging on the Japanese about taking some with me. I agree....that stuff gets you ripped....tastes ok, pretty sweet and a mild flavor...not bad at all....just dont finish the bottle and drink a bunch of beer at the same time like I did....It was a good time, but I did wake up to throw up which I rarely do...also, its not a fun hangover.
by Avery rate this post as useful

Online Purchase 2008/4/4 18:03
Well, if you can purchase habushu online...it would be awesome. I personally would pick up a couple bottles without the snake just to try it for medicinal purposes....building a tolerance does raise your immune system and it couldnt hurt to try a little bit a day....it does give you a great buzz for a little amount.
by Avery rate this post as useful

hame shochu 2008/5/9 14:25
where i live,in the Japanese countryside,it is called hame shochu and cures anything from burns,bites,cuts to backache!It must be made with a live snake and not a dead one!
by maguchan rate this post as useful

Habu & mamushi are different. 2008/5/28 21:23
They are both pit vipers, but different genus.

Habu zake and mamushi zake are traditionally made using awamori, an alcoholic beverage from Okinawa.

The snake is placed in a vessel which is filled with awamori, then left to age for at least a year. The venom infuses with the alcohol.

Where I live, in Shikoku, the tradition is to place the live mamushi into a vessel half filled with water. The snake is left alive in the vessel for two or three weeks to cleanse. After that, the water is removed and the vessel is filled with awamori or a shōchū. It is left for a year or longer.

Mamushi zake is supposed to provide energy, and act as an aphrodisiac.

I have been told not to drink more than a shot glass in one night as it can kill me. This might or might not be true. I did wet the bed one night after drinking some.

Awamori tastes similar to Brazil's Cachaça. With a year old snake in it, it tastes like meat flavoured alcohol. It's not something I appreciate, but mamushi zake tends to be something drunk only by the older generation.

As above, it will last a long time as long as the snake does not become exposed to air. Alcohol is a preservative. Top up the bottle as necessary. Any high percentage alcohol will work, but anything other than habu/mamushi zake will affect the flavour (only a problem if you enjoy meat flavoured alcohol).

Another similar drink is hachi zake. It's the same as mamushi zake except the snake is replaced with japanese hornets. Also tastes like meat.

All in all, habu/mamushi zake is a drink for old people/thrill seekers/the impotent. It's interesting to try, but I'd rather drink a caipirinha than a shot of mamushi zake.

by Chris rate this post as useful

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