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Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/12 19:27
Hi all,

Just briefly I'm so excited to finally be going to a country I've wanted to visit since I was a teen (I'm now 22) and can't wait for my holiday!

So as I work in a busy pub in the UK I have to be strategic about when to have time off, so I'm booking a week off work with 5 days planned in Japan, a day before so I can get all my packing and travel to the airport ready and a day after to recover from jetlag haha. While watching blogs and reading website guides my biggest concern is buying stuff and eating out. Buying a ticket for a train or visting a castle or visiting somewhere free like a park or shrine is obviously fine but what do I say at a noodle stand, convenience store or bar/resteraunt? Is it fine just learning the Japanese for how much is this and pointing at it or is there more useful phrases to know?

And then the second part of this question is recommendations really? Food, quirky little shops etc? I know this is broad and I have a few things on a bucket list already but I love walking around and exploring so any new recommendations I will try and do! I'm staying in Tokyo in Taiko-kun, so Akihabara is my first stop once I've recovered from the time difference and checked in to my hostel! Thanks for all replies in advance!
by Waldz580 (guest)  

Re: Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/13 08:01
I would say that you can get around Tokyo without knowing any Japanese, but it always helps to know few basics (like: Help, Excuse me, Where is X, etc.). Train ticket vending machines offer English language option, so itfs not difficult once you get the hang of it. Some eateries only have menu in Japanese, or you have to buy meal tickets on vending machine thatfs in Japanese. For those, you will need to get help from either a stranger nearby or restaurant staff. I remember watching a YouTube vlogger and her friend buying two ramen without knowing what they were - one turned out to be a big hit, but the other one was a total dud. In the end, mistakes can turn into fun memories so donft fear mistakes.

Have a fun trip!
by daijobu (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/13 10:09
Ton of tips on YouTube, why you couldn't find?
https://youtu.be/66P5_R37vek
https://youtu.be/zeZh6jz495M
https://youtu.be/2rppnse7IkM

2nd woman is not a Japanese, though.
by Michael Booth (guest) rate this post as useful

Re: Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/13 10:30
In the case of no English menu available, pictures on restaurant menus are pretty common there. You can always point to what looks good and say gkoreh in a worst case scenario. I think youfll be okay, though.
by Gregalor rate this post as useful

Re: Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/13 11:43
If you are willing to learn Japanese, it is a good thing. Even the simplest Japanese can help you on your trip. But even if you don't, you will be just fine, especially that you only stay in Tokyo. Using broken grammar can help them understand easier (like "this, how much?" instead of "how much is this"). Once you get there, you will realize how much easier it actually is than what you are thinking, so nothing to worry really.

As far as recommendations go, it is largely depends on what you want to see, what interests you. Just browse this site for a couple of hours then you will easily have your whole 5-day schedule.
by JPN48 rate this post as useful

Re: Eating out/making a purchase 2019/4/15 11:42
u Is it fine just learning the Japanese for how much is this and pointing at it or is there more useful phrases to know?v

If you're obviously not Japanese, store clerks in Japan won't be offended by your limited vocabulary, so don't sweat it.

If you're looking to practice with another phrases though, one which I use pretty often when shopping (which you might already know, though maybe not in these contexts) is "onegai shimasu."

It literally just means "please" or "I request," but I often say it before the clerk rings up my purchases. For example, if I'm at the convenience store and buying some rice ball, tea, candy, etc., rather than just silently plop my basket on the counter at the register, I'll say "onegai shimasu" to the clerk as I set it down, to convey "I'd like to purchase these, so please ring them up."

Of course, the clerk would understand I want to buy the items even if I didn't say anything, but it makes the exchange a little more personable to say something.
by . . . . (guest) rate this post as useful

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